REVIEW: ‘The Flash,’ Issue #783

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Flash #783

The Flash #783 is published by DC Comics, written by Jeremy Adams, art by Amancay Nahuelpan, colours by Jeromy Cox, and letters by Rob Leigh. This is a tie-in to the Dark Crisis event and is the start of the “The Search for Barry Allen” arc. With the Justice League dead and Barry Allen missing, Wally and the other speedsters gather to search the Multiverse for him. There are three possible places for him to be, all separate Earths, which means splitting up.

The issue’s plot is almost entirely set up for the arc, laying out the mission details and the direction for the speedsters to run in. Adams fills the comic with exposition, almost repeating himself at many points, meaning the comic can appear too focused on story and dialogue. Not only is the premise of the upcoming arc explained, but past plot lines that are yet unresolved find their way into the script as well. This can give The Flash #783 a static pace for a large part of the comic. But then the book picks up a gear, and there is a sudden panic as an unexpected problem completely disrupts the immaculate planning. It fits with the family theme of this run in addition to filling the mission with extreme peril.

This comic taps into a part of The Flash that has been integral to the comic’s warmth since its foundation: family. After the death of the Justice League, the Flash Family find themselves needing Barry not just because he’s one of the remaining senior heroes left but because they want their family reunited. This is an incredibly heartfelt core to launch a tie-in that also possesses the potential to be soul-crushing. Wally and Barry now have this absolute faith in each other, always believing that the other is alive even if they are on another Earth and will run to them if they need help. There is such a beautifully strong connection between the Speedsters that makes every comic they are in endearing. 

The art is fantastic but restrained for much of the issue. Due to the majority of The Flash #783 being within one laboratory, Nahuelpan’s muscles are not truly flexed within this first issue. All the heroes are superbly designed, with their iconic costumes next to each other. There is an excellent understanding of facial expressions as a flurry of emotions is exhibited by the characters. Most of them are somber and serious, focused on the task at hand. But others are giddy with excitement, and the joy on their faces is captured nicely. By the end of the issue, it showcases a sneak peek of the three different worlds that this story will entail. All of them are awesome and incredibly varied, homaging different movies and comics. Here, Nahuelpan does demonstrate a brilliant skill of altering their art style to fit a different world, invoking opposing looks for the Multiverse.

The colours are fantastic. The vibrancy of the costumes is clear from the start, with stunning blending between tones that create amazing details in the characters’ hair. Each of the new worlds has different palettes depicting them, denoting the general atmosphere of their planet, but they are not drastic enough to be overpowering. The lettering is excellent and effortless to read.

The Flash #783 needs a run-up to build excitement. The beginning of this new arc threatened to zap the momentum right from the get-go, from a start that could feel overly filled with exposition. The marvelous art wasn’t quite enticing enough from the first half of paces. But once the mission unfolds and that sense of adventure starts, the energy sizzles through the comic. It is frustrating that it takes so long and therefore only offers a glimpse of what is to come, but it absolutely left me wanting to pick up the next issue to keep reading.

The Flash #783 is available where comics are sold.


The Flash #783
3.5

TL;DR

The Flash #783 needs a run-up to build excitement. The beginning of this new arc threatened to zap the momentum right from the get-go, from a start that could feel overly filled with exposition. Once the mission unfolds and that sense of adventure starts, the energy sizzles through the comic.