REVIEW: ‘Iron Fist,’ Issue #4

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Iron Fist #4 - But Why Tho

Iron Fist #4 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Alyssa Wong, art by Michael Yg, colours by Jay David Ramos and letters by Sean Chen. Last issue, the new Iron Fist and his allies defeated a monster who had been embedded in K’un L’un. Now they are on a new mission, but Fat Cobra and Bride of Nine Spiders stop them in their tracks.

The plot of this issue is heavily combat-based, and there is a succinct feeling that everything is traversing to one particular point as multiple parties are beginning to gather. Following the tradition of this run, this issue follows from where the last one left off, with another big test for our heroes. There is this desperation to the story as we are persistently reminded of a danger happening, and those meant to prevent it are blocked from reaching it. The speed of the story is kept high, literally propelling Lin Lie towards his goals. The fights are brilliantly varied, changing the opponent and the setting. The fantasy elements of this story are awesome and leaves me constantly guessing as to what is faced next. The end of Iron Fist #4 adds a very different dynamic to a kung-fu story that’s already about change. It was a big surprise.

From the previous couple of issues, it would be easy to assume that Lin Lie had mastered his control over his powers. But in this chapter it is barely seen, faltering worse than it ever had done in other books. It shows that his progression isn’t perfect. What he and his friends face in the comic is also a superb choice by Wong. For in order for this new generation to be proven, they have to best or at least impress the ones that came before. Danny Rand is fascinated by Lin Lie, but Fat Cobra and Bride are still unimpressed. The different parties interacting with each other feels like part of the rite of passage into becoming the true Iron Fist.

The art is impressive. From the first fight, it is evident this issue would look amazing. Yg displays the differences in fighting style beautifully, as well as the very opposing size differences. The line weights alternate from very small for minute details to completely submerging shadows that create silhouettes. With this many bodies involved in the battle, the artist has an excellent understanding of where everyone is and the choreography of each person. Some of the designs for the foes Lie Lin faces are formidable, and monstrous in their scale. All of this is taken place in a location that has been gorgeously illustrated. 

The colours are stunning. Ramos somehow ensures that Lie Lin is richer in his tones than anyone else in the comic. The green and the gold of his costume are so distinct that they stand out against any other shades, whilst the magic around his fists literally glows. He is a vibrant hero and that is being represented by his visuals. The lettering is very easy to read, as Chen uses large text frequently.

Iron Fist #4 is an amazing issue. It is alive with energy as the characters all hurtle toward each other. Every chapter of this series brings something slightly different to the story, blending the tradition of K’un L’un with something destined to break it. The old is being damaged by the new, and this theme keeps reoccurring. Every fight scene is epic and the story leaves me engaged from the first page to the last.

Iron Fist #4 is available where comics are sold.


Iron Fist #4
5

TL;DR

Iron Fist #4 is an amazing issue. It is alive with energy as the characters all hurtle toward each other. Every chapter of this series brings something slightly different to the story, blending the tradition of K’un L’un with something destined to break it. The old is being damaged by the new, and this theme keeps reoccurring. Every fight scene is epic and the story leaves me engaged from the first page to the last.