REVIEW: ‘Captain Carter,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Captain Carter #3 - But Why Tho

Captain Carter #3 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Jamie McKelvie, art by Marika Cresta, colours by Matt Milla, and letters by Clayton Cowles. After challenging the Prime Minister, Agent Braddock found herself under attack in her own home. With the discovery that they can no longer trust anyone, Carter goes back to the home base for answers and meets the Tony Stark of this universe.

This is an action-packed plot that wastes no time getting started. Starting right where the last issue ended, it maintains the momentum of the story well. There is a small breathing period where the two heroes try to gather themselves after the attack but the quick battles resume almost instantly. Many of the plot points appear to have been heavily influenced by Captain America: The Winter Soldier but are comfortably adjusted to fit both a different medium and story. What McKelvie also adds is a blend of modern political observations within a fictional framework, noting eerie similarities between current governments and those that are meant to be ridiculous exaggerations.

The characters in Captain Carter #3 are fascinating. As mentioned in a previous review, this book is set in a practically brand new timeline. So whilst Betsy Braddock and Tony Stark are stalwarts in the main universe, here, what they are able to do is unknown. Revealing their capabilities is done slowly so that the ultimate display is exciting. Braddock discovers something huge about herself in this issue, something that will definitely change her role in the story. And the variation in Stark’s technology provides a unique twist to the inventor. The relationships that are being built are both fun and engaging to read, with the strongest being the friendship of Peggy and Lizzie. It feels fresh and unique, a perfect choice considering the British spin on the story.

The art is superb. Cresta expertly details a sequence of events. There are panes that show characters noticing the situation, then another reacting, then a response. The storytelling that this method achieves is phenomenal. The detail and specificity in the facial expressions increase the strength of these moments as fear is portrayed superbly. The world itself continues to look stunning as different parts of London are depicted. There is also a variety in the battles shown within this issue. There are the high-energy martial arts fights that Carter embodies, with huge hand-to-hand set pieces. There is technology and weaponry, and even some glimpses at superpowers. All of this provides expanse and depth to a new world.

The colours have a passionate vibrancy to them, but that is in collaboration with tones set in reality. Carter’s brilliant costume and Braddock’s pink hair are bright beacons, but they aren’t out of place among everyday London. This gives both characters a sense of place. The lettering is standard but very easy to read.

Captain Carter #3 is a beautiful book. McKelvie is really proving himself as a writer with this series as this issue contains an excellent script and terrific drama. Other stories are adapted to make Peggy’s her own. It is her personality that is the drive of the comic and is unique to this universe. That is partnered with stunning artwork that brings several amazing fight scenes to life, giving it a cinematic quality. Every issue is introducing someone or something new, and the slow exploration of this timeline makes me desperate to discover more.

Captain Carter #3 is available where comics are sold.


Captain Carter #3
5

TL;DR

Captain Carter #3 is a beautiful book. McKelvie is really proving himself as a writer with this series as this issue contains an excellent script and terrific drama. Other stories are adapted to make Peggy’s her own. It is her personality that is the drive of the comic and is unique to this universe. That is partnered with stunning artwork that brings several amazing fight scenes to life, giving it a cinematic quality. Every issue is introducing someone or something new, and the slow exploration of this timeline makes me desperate to discover more.