REVIEW: ‘Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca,’ Issue #2

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Star Wars Han Solo & Chewbacca #2- But Why Tho

Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #2 is written by Marc Guggenheim, illustrated by David Medina, colored by Alex Sinclair, and lettered by VC’s Joe Caramagna. It’s published by Marvel Comics. Part 2 of “The Crystal Star” finds Han Solo coming face to face with a mysterious man named Ovan Sarakel who claims to be his father. Han ultimately decides to bring Ovan along for the heist that he, Chewbacca, and Greedo have planned. But Han is still wracked with doubt about his father’s identity.

On paper, the idea of Han Solo dealing with his long-lost father is an interesting one, as it might explain his loner nature. However, this is a story beat that Guggenheim’s explored before, most notably in his underrated Blade run. It also brings out the well-worn plot point of Han not being able to trust anybody, which was already explored in Solo: A Star Wars Story. Han even flashes back to a key moment in that film. And for a series named Han Solo & Chewbacca, there is very little Chewbacca. Ironically, the series feels more dedicated to building up the rivalry between Han and Greedo. If the series continues past this initial arc, I hope Guggenheim is able to give Chewie a focus.

Despite these quibbles, the rest of the issue plays out like a heist film, down to the perfectly laid out plan and said plan going horribly wrong. All of it is illustrated beautifully by Messina, who continues to give Corellia the shine and sheen of a bustling metropolis. In contrast, a scene on Tatooine features nothing but dusty piles of sand as far as the eye can see. Messina also deserves props for illustrating Han in a way that captures his look from the original trilogy while still putting his own stamp on the Star Wars universe. That stamp includes Marshall Buck Vancto, who looks less like a Star Wars character and more like he stepped out of a Power Rangers episode—not that that’s a bad thing.

Sinclair’s color art also helps Corellia and Tattoine feel like two separate planets. Corellia is mostly massive grey skyscrapers and cold blue skies, which combined with its shipbuilding industry makes it feel more in line with big cities like New York and Los Angeles. Tatooine is all golden sunset and dusty tan dunes and will make the reader’s mouth dry just by looking at it. That color also permeates Caramagna’s lettering; for example, an alarm is depicted in large red letters that nearly overtake the page, and Chewie’s roars threaten to break out of his word balloons—literally, as cracks appear in the lettering.

Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #2 piles on the angst for Han Solo, as the smuggler comes face to face with a man claiming to be his father. I hope this plot point isn’t a dead end and leads to some genuinely emotional moments, and I also hope that future episodes give Chewbacca an equal focus. Plus, there’s the question of why Vancto is after Han. Either way, you slice it, everyone’s favorite scoundrel can’t catch a break.

Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #2 is available wherever comics are sold.


Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #2
3.5

TL;DR

Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #2 piles on the angst for Han Solo, as the smuggler comes face to face with a man claiming to be his father. I hope this plot point isn’t a dead end and leads to some genuinely emotional moments, and I also hope that future episodes give Chewbacca an equal focus. Plus, there’s the question of why Vancto is after Han. Either way, you slice it, everyone’s favorite scoundrel can’t catch a break.