ADVANCED REVIEW: ‘Moon Knight: Black, White & Blood,’ Issue #1

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Moon Knight Black, White & Blood #1 - But Why Tho

Moon Knight: Black, White & Blood #1 is an anthology series published by Marvel Comics. The debut issue features three separate tales focused on the lunar vigilante. “Anubis Rex” is written by Jonathan Hickman and illustrated by Chris Bachalo, “So White, Yet So Dark” is written by Murewa Ayodale and illustrated by Dotun Akande, and “The End” is written by Marc Guggenheim and illustrated by Jorge Fornes. The entire issue is lettered by VC’s Cory Petit.

In the tradition of other Black, White & Blood series that have featured Marvel’s more mature-skewing characters, including Wolverine and Carnage, this trio of Moon Knight tales is presented in a black and white format that ever so often is peppered with bursts of red. And given that Moon Knight is coming off of a critically acclaimed TV miniseries, the timing couldn’t have been better. I also feel that an anthology format is perfect for Moon Knight, as he’s a character who’s crossed multiple genres including horror and crime drama in addition to more superheroic exploits.

True to form, each story has a different genre and hook. “Anubis Rex” is a tale that wears its science fiction influences on its sleeve, featuring a future version of Moon Knight who battles mutant scarabs and travels in a pyramid-shaped spaceship. “So White, Yet So Dark” features a superhero team-up between Moon Knight and Spider-Man, with the web-slinger’s wisecracking nature serving as a foil to Moon Knight’s stoicism. But “The End” is the most interesting one, as it’s literally a story told in reverse. Watching it unfold is quite the experience.

The creators involved are also a major draw. Hickman is best known for his epic runs on titles including Fantastic FourX-Men, and Secret Wars while Bachalo’s illustrated nearly every Marvel character. They give the future Moon Knight a design that pays homage to her predecessor, including a white cloak that covers her futuristic armor. She also has a sidekick of sorts named Bunny and a dog she adores, leading to one of the issue’s more hilarious moments.

Ayodale and Akande are best known for their Action Lab title New Men. They fit into the Marvel Universe perfectly, with Ayodale nailing the character interactions and Akande playing into the theme by giving Spidey a costume similar to the one he wears in Spider-Man: No Way Home. And Guggenheim is no stranger to grim, gritty vigilantes thanks to his work on Arrow. He has Moon Knight defending an informant from the criminals known as the Maggia, which Fornes brings to life via his simple yet striking artwork that makes use of shadows and snow to set a foreboding atmosphere.

Moon Knight: Black, White & Blood #1 uses the anthology format to great effect, delivering a trio of blood-soaked tales starring the lunar vigilante. With three more issues to go, there’s a chance for more fan-favorite creators to present their own take on Moon Knight. And I hope that Marvel continues to use the Black, White & Blood format for other characters; it seems tailor-made for someone like Blade.

Moon Knight: Black, White & Blood #1 will be available wherever comics are sold on May 11, 2022.


Moon Knight: Black, White & Blood #1
4.5

TL;DR

Moon Knight: Black, White & Blood #1 uses the anthology format to great effect, delivering a trio of blood-soaked tales starring the lunar vigilante. With three more issues to go, there’s a chance for more fan-favorite creators to present their own take on Moon Knight. And I hope that Marvel continues to use the Black, White & Blood format for other characters; it seems tailor-made for someone like Blade.