REVIEW: ‘Moon Knight’ – Episode 3

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Moon Knight Episode 3

Moon Knight Episode 3 may be the series’ best episode yet, as it folds layers of Egyptian mythology and culture into its narrative alongside a dash of spycraft. Picking up immediately after the end of the previous episode, Marc Spector (Oscar Isaac) has traveled to Egypt at the behest of Khonshu (F. Murray Abraham) so that they can beseech the council of Egyptian gods to stop Arthur Harrow (Ethan Hawke) from resurrecting Amnit. Spector and his wife Layla El-Faouly (May Calamawy) also seek a map that will lead them to Amnit’s tomb, which is in the possession of wealthy collector Anton Mogart (Gaspard Ulliel).

Each episode of Moon Knight so far has tackled a different genre. The premiere was a slow-burn horror, the second episode was a full-on dive into horror/action a la Underworld, and now this episode features spy elements in the vein of James Bond. Given Spector’s past as a mercenary, this makes a lot of sense and also builds up to an intense action sequence where Spector and Layla fight off Mogart’s forces in a jousting ring. Once again, we see Issac switch between Spector’s Moon Knight and Steven Grant’s Mr. Knight, with different results; Moon Knight is more swift and brutal, taking down enemies with punches and moon darts, while Mr. Knight tries to defuse the situation and fails. Writers Beau DeMayo, Peter Cameron, and Sabir Pizirda

Moon Knight Episode 3 features the return of Mohamed Diab to the director’s chair, and he takes the chance to portray Egypt in an actually authentic way. For once, there are no constant shots of the pyramids except for when the action takes place in the desert and when Spector finds access to the Great Pyramid of Giza to talk to the council of gods. In other words, the pyramids actually play a part in the story rather than being set dressing. Diab also doesn’t use the yellow filter that has been an annoying staple of films and television projects set in Africa and/or the Middle East; Egypt actually looks like a real place. And for once, there is a collection of Egyptian gods other than Anubis. Diab has been open in interviews that he wants to properly represent his Egyptian heritage, and he succeeds.

Writers Beau DeMayo, Peter Cameron, and Sabir Pirzada also succeed in presenting an engaging narrative; the show continues to build on its current plot threads while introducing new ones. Apparently, Spector has had blackouts similar to Steven and woken up to dead bodies, but he has no memories of doing it. Those who have read the Moon Knight comics know that Steven and Spector are not the only personalities that Moon Knight has due to his Disassociative Identity Disorder. If that personality is causing trouble, it could be another interesting twist the show adds to the comic mythos. More is also revealed about Layla, specifically how she and her father sought to restore Egyptian artifacts and his untimely death, which could potentially drive a wedge between her and Marc. Cameron had previously worked on WandaVision. DeMayo and Pirzada will be helming X-Men ’97 and Nova for Marvel Studios, respectively. Their work on this episode only makes me more excited for those upcoming projects.

A good story and direction can only take you so far, and the cast continues to be at the top of their game. Issac indulges his inner action hero, leaping from rooftop to rooftop and engaging in combat. Since he also is playing Spector for the majority of the episode, it’s a change in pace. Spector is more confident and skilled than Steven. Still, his people skills are extremely lacking, and there’s friction between himself and Calamawy’s Layla, leading to a remorseful conversation on a boat ride to Mogart’s compound. Hawke continues to be a magnetic force as Harrow, convincing the other gods that Khonshu is a threat that needs to be taken care of and even weaponizing Spector’s own mental health around himself. And Ulliel, who sadly died early this year, makes the most of his final role as Mogart, playing “rich douchebag” extremely well.

Moon Knight Episode 3 mixes Egyptian mythology and culture into its espionage-themed narrative as the series reaches its halfway point. With a jaw-dropping cliffhanger, the show has more than earned its role atop the peak of Marvel Studios’ television efforts, and I can’t wait to see where the second half takes things.

New episodes of Moon Knight premiere Wednesdays on Disney+.


Moon Knight Episode 3
  • 9.5/10
    Rating - 9.5/10
9.5/10

TL;DR

Moon Knight Episode 3 mixes Egyptian mythology and culture into its espionage-themed narrative as the series reaches its halfway point. With a jaw-dropping cliffhanger, the show has more than earned its role atop the peak of Marvel Studios’ television efforts, and I can’t wait to see where the second half takes things.