ADVANCED REVIEW: ‘Marauders,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Marauders #1 - But Why Tho

Marauders #1 is a brand new comic published by Marvel Comics. Written by Steve Orlando, art by Eleonora Carlini, colours by Matt Milla and letters by Ariana Maher. The Marauders is a team led by Kate Pryde with the mission of rescuing mutants. In this issue, an altered lineup sets out on an intergalactic adventure. But one of the new recruits will leave others uncomfortable with their inclusion.

The plot of this issue is fractured but ultimately exciting. The story moves between locations and characters a lot, and the transitions from one to another can lack coherence. The cold open is full of heat and fuels the enthusiasm for the book. But then gathering the group for their interstellar adventure possibly takes too long. There is a large amount of character development and introductions, some more effective than others, and then the journey commences. At this point, Marauders #1 transforms into a space opera with politics and prophecies. It’s incredibly grand and has a huge scale. There are many plot lines being started, but I am unsure if Orlando mixes them well together, instead leading to confusion.

In regards to the lineup, this is a group of heroes and former villains that have great potential. Led by Kate Pryde, the fire she has always had makes her a fitting focal point. Bishop and Psylocke are known faces with huge personalities, Aurora as well. Tempo and Somnus are relatively new but are gripping in their abilities and their role in this team. Daken is a personal favourite and I am excited to see how his storyline progresses. But the most prominent aspect of this team is a hidden member. They are a massive surprise and are a giant grenade to throw into a room of mutants. Orlando’s script is exceptional in stoking the reactions from other representatives of the Marauders. One of the fascinating conversations it sets up is how this hatred is different to that of other inhabitants of Krakoa, creating intelligent and intriguing discussions.

The art could draw out some mixed reactions, but for some of the figures in Marauders #1, their look is superb and fits their character. The best example is Tempo, Psylocke, and Kate. The latter of the three has possibly the greatest design in this comic. The shape of her face is beautifully framed by the sheer volume of hair she has. Perhaps the weakest of the bunch is Daken. Whilst there is a charm to the emotion present on his face, the proportions between his head and his torso are odd. But it should be admired how Carlini changes the entire shape of each character, so every individual is unique in how they look. And yet they fit into the same world. The artist is also excellent at invoking awe in the set pieces they create. Both the beginning and end of the issue have these epic splash pages filled with emotion and power.

The colours are gorgeous. Those two splash pages mentioned in the last paragraph are made all the more powerful by Milla bathing the entire page in a combination of the same colour (red in both instances. It is so eye-catching and the strength of the shades leads to the action jumping out at you. This power that the colours contain is everywhere, making the ability the mutants use look incredibly cool. The letters are the regular font that is used for the X-titles, and the designs Maher uses for the insert between scenes are interesting and easy to read.

Marauders #1 has a lot to like. The art is unique and full of creative designs and action pieces. There is a team dynamic brimming with tension and uncertainty, one that may lead to some fantastic confrontations further down the line. However, the plot is complicated and filled with conflicting storylines. They could be brilliant several issues down the line, but the way in which Orlando tries to set them up in this comic doesn’t allow space for any of them to breathe. It may have been more beneficial to save some subplots until the second issue. 

Marauders #1 is available where comics are sold. 


Marauders #1
3.5

TL;DR

Marauders #1 has a lot to like. The art is unique and full of creative designs and action pieces. There is a team dynamic brimming with tension and uncertainty, one that may lead to some fantastic confrontations further down the line. However, the plot is complicated and filled with conflicting storylines. They could be brilliant several issues down the line, but the way in which Orlando tries to set them up in this comic doesn’t allow space for any of them to breathe. It may have been more beneficial to save some subplots until the second issue.