REVIEW: ‘Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Halcyon Legacy #2

Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2 is written by Ethan Sacks while Will Sliney provides art, Rachelle Rosenberg colors, Joe Sabino letters, and E.M Gist rounds out the team as the cover artist. The second edition to this miniseries continues the expand the lore behind the legendary vessel, the Halycon.  Continuing the use of two plotlines, Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2 follows the crew defending against the space pirate Crimson Jack in the main plot and a story featuring the cunning bounty hunter Aurra Sing in the subplot.

Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2 opens the Halycon is being bombarded by the dreaded Crimson Jack. It becomes known that the space pirate is not out to plunder the ship. Instead, they are looking for a Rebel spy, which comes as a surprise to Captain Keevan, the captain of the Halycon. In an effort to be rid of the pirates and protect the passengers on board the starcruiser, Captain Keevan decides the best course of action is to take the ship directly through a solar storm. Meanwhile, readers switch back to the other characters introduced in Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #1 who are all dealing with the effects of the attack.

Shorr Komrrin, Cimina, and D3-09 rush through the corridor as Shorr is determined to get to the bridge and Cimina is worried about the solar storm. D3-09 is unable to calm Shorr continues on throughout the ship despite the droid’s warnings. However, to ease the mind of young Shorr, D3 tells a story from some time ago when the Halycon dealt with a different solar storm. Unlike their previous story, D3’s story focuses on a villainous bounty hunter on vacation. Aurra Sing gets wrapped up in a protection job that places her wrong end of a predavorexx. This minotaur-like creature is something new for the Star Wars universe and unlike anything I have seen in canon. Artist Sliney does a fantastic job of blending this mystical fantasy creature into the Star Wars universe to where it doesn’t feel out of place in the slightest.

Despite a familiar face in Aurra Sing and a new creature to obsess over, Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2 doesn’t quite hit as hard for me as its predecessor did. For such a short series, I expected the main plot to move a little faster but there wasn’t a lot of progress outside of Captain Keevan’s interest in the Rebel spy. The subplot was compelling enough but I did hope to learn a little more about Aurra Sing outside of that she enjoys luxury vacations. Fans of the animated The Clone Wars series will remember her not being the most redeemable of characters but some part of me was hoping for some new insight into the mind of that treacherous bounty hunter.

Overall, Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2 does its job as a second issue. I am interested to learn more about these new characters and am still excited to see what new stories are in tow. With that said, as a tie-in series for the Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser experience, I was hoping for a little more lore to expand on the mythos of the Halycon.  Even if I didn’t get that,  I am really coming to enjoy writer Stack’s style.  He has a great way of using dialogue and humor to flow the story from the main plot to the subplot. The subplot didn’t relate back to the main plot in the same way as the first issue which was slightly jarring. However, a well-timed joke made it all worthwhile. I look forward to the next issue to see what new things come from the mind of the Stacks and Sliney duo.

Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2 is available wherever comics are sold.


Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2
3.5

TL;DR

Overall, Star Wars: Halcyon Legacy #2 does its job as a second issue. I am interested to learn more about these new characters and am still excited to see what new stories are in tow. With that said, as a tie-in series for the Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser experience, I was hoping for a little more lore to expand on the mythos of the Halycon.  Even if I didn’t get that,  I am really coming to enjoy writer Stack’s style.  He has a great way of using dialogue and humor to flow the story from the main plot to the subplot. The subplot didn’t relate back to the main plot in the same way as the first issue which was slightly jarring. However, a well-timed joke made it all worthwhile. I look forward to the next issue to see what new things come from the mind of the Stacks and Sliney duo.