REVIEW: ‘Iron Fist,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Iron Fist #1 - But Why Tho

Iron Fist #1 is part of a brand new series published by Marvel Comics. Written by Alyssa Wong, art by Michael Yg, colours by Jay David Ramos, and letters by Travis Lanham. 

Danny Rand gave up the Iron Fist to save the world. That means that the egg of Shou-Lao needs to be awakened once more. Fighting demons, Rand is suddenly aided by a new, young hero, wearing the symbol of the Iron Fist. With glowing fists and incredible abilities, there appears to be a new holder of Danny’s mantle.

This is a great plot for a brand new series. There is a mystery that serves as an underlying goal, a feature that will become the ultimate destination of the series. Jumping between K’un-L’un and New York, the cities are interspersed yet both appear important to this new series. Iron Fist #1 doesn’t waste any time before getting into the action, with a fight scene happening very early on. This combat is recurring, providing this first issue with energy. The story of the Iron Fist has been retold several times, but it is important to note that Wong introduces something very different with this new version. The identity is revealed quickly inside this issue, but it is still a big surprise.

The characters in this comic are fantastic. The new Iron Fist is the one in the spotlight and the interesting factor. This reviewer will try their best to hide the true identity, but the one main hint that could be given is it isn’t a new character. The circumstances of how they became Iron Fist is genius and provides a fascinating potential for complications. It changes what the readers may know about the character, repurposing them for a different path. It shows how comic creators can completely shift the direction of a figure and rejuvenate their place in their respective universes.

It should also be said that it is nice that Danny Rand hasn’t been completely extricated from comics after giving up the Iron Fist mantle. In fact, he is very crucial to the first half of the issue, being part of both fight scenes. A great feature that Wong includes is that Danny is an elite fighter even if his fists aren’t glowing. This is the story of the new Iron Fist, but it is also part of the tradition, that the old fighter exists as their mentor.

The art is brilliant. The action inside this kung-fu series is epic in its depiction. Yg adds intricate details to body posture and movements so that each attack is slightly different. The speed and the ferocity in which they attack provide the comic with pace and a feeling of momentum. Rand no longer wears a costume but Yg still draws him superbly. Now brawling in casual attire, there is an air of a street fighter to him. And then there is the brand new Iron Fist. With a design that loyally pays homage to those that came before but with affectations that look new, it is a cool and exciting uniform. The creatures in the book are monstrous and awesome, and both cities are stunning to look at.

The colours are gorgeous. The locations are warm and inviting. The moments of magic are made more resplendent because of the rich colours that bathe them in light. The brand new costume has slight alterations to the classic shades, or green and gold. What is incredible is that this is a line mentioned in dialogue and then Ramos followed through and included the change in the colour scheme. The lettering is great as well. There are a lot of uses of SFX, with Lanham beautifully wrapping them around objects and lacing them into the world.

Iron Fist #1 is a stunning merge of the past and present. The main characters and the mythology of this comic have existed before this book, from Danny Rand to the new hero to the entire fable of the Iron Fist. And yet Wong is forging a new story from all of them, literally shattering parts of their history to craft new legends. The writing and the dialogue are energetic and enjoyable. The art detailing the fight scenes and gorgeous battlefields is a visual delight.

Iron Fist #1 is available where comics are sold.


Iron Fist #1
5

TL;DR

Iron Fist #1 is a stunning merge of the past and present. The main characters and the mythology of this comic have existed before this book, from Danny Rand to the new hero to the entire fable of the Iron Fist. And yet Wong is forging a new story from all of them, literally shattering parts of their history to craft new legends. The writing and the dialogue are energetic and enjoyable. The art detailing the fight scenes and gorgeous battlefields is a visual delight.