REVIEW: ‘Nightwing’, Issue #89

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Nightwing #89

Nightwing #89 begins a story with DC’s new Superman, the Son of Kal-El! This issue comes courtesy of writer Tom Taylor, artist Bruno Redondo, colorist Adriano Lucas, and letterer Wes Abbott. As we saw last time around, Dick is blessing Bludhaven with money and shelter for the unhoused, making him the target of villains. Put that on hold for a month or so because another hero is having a trial that requires expert mentoring.

But first, let’s have a flashback to the days of Nightwing’s red and black costume (classic!). Parachuting down to a cave with Batman, Dick and Bruce find young, scared Jon Kent back before he grows into his big boy pants. Superman arrives, and I have to say, this entire scene is a moving tribute to parents and how they fret over whether they will ever do right by their children. The dialogue, pacing, art, colors, words, everything hits and gives us the heart of four amazing characters. Again this team makes Nightwing soar, but Taylor also holds the reigns on the Son of Kal-El book as well, so he is adept at giving us a new renaissance of young heroes while precisely knowing what makes the classics tick.

Fast forward to today. Jon Kent has taken up the mantle of Superman (surely you know this by now) but needs counsel. With his father off in outer space, he finds a Fortress of Solitude recording of him does not relieve his doubts. Jon fought a monster, but in the battle, lives were lost, and he could not move past this. Overhearing this, Kelex, Superman’s trusty bot, seeks out Nightwing. As much as I love Kelex and his great characterization this issue, the best part is that Dick and Barbara woke up in the same bed. Yes, we know they are an item now, and the kiss proved it, but I live in fear month after month that suddenly DC will end it. Anyway, Dick heads off to Metropolis, where he already had a prior meeting, and here a bit of convenience occurs that I don’t think was necessary to bring in other characters from Superman’s book, but it’s here. Anyway, the two will become embroiled in a new crime spree, and fans will see Nightwing as a mentor, and it is, again, touching. 

Nightwing #89 is emotional goodness, and Taylor keeps writing it with ease. This time around, he’s brought forward empathy, discipline, and familial comfort that ups the heartwarming. There’s no slacking on the action, as we get a dose of it, and everything is graced by Redondo’s light yet noble penmanship and Lucas’ neon dayglo against Supes’ solid red, blue, yellow motif. Abbott renders some nice Kelex balloons and info words in white with blue borders that are easy to read despite the issue’s prevalence of blue. I think by now, the entire creative team could put out a peak issue of Nightwing in their sleep, and this one is no different. Putting the heart upfront in heroism is lacking nowadays, and in this issue, it’s right there. I wish I didn’t have to jump to another book (Superman: Son of Kal-El #9) to see Part Two, but you know how comics can be. Worth every penny, of course, and the interactions between every character, words, and visuals, are breathtaking.

Nightwing #89 is available wherever comic books are sold.


Nightwing #89
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TL;DR

Nightwing #89 is emotional goodness, and Taylor keeps writing it with ease. This time around, he’s brought forward empathy, discipline, and familial comfort that ups the heartwarming.