REVIEW: ‘Batman: The Knight,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Batman The Knight #2 - But Why Tho

Batman: The Knight #2 is written by Chip Zdarsky, illustrated by Carmine Di Giandomenico, colored by Ivan Plascencia, and lettered by Pat Brosseau. It’s published by DC Comics. Four weeks after he left Gotham City University, Bruce Wayne has taken up residence in Paris and encounters a master thief known as the “Grey Shadow.” Bruce decides to learn everything he can from the Grey Shadow but is conflicted both by his feelings for her and his promise to his parents—and how that promise will lead to him breaking the law. Complicating matters is a mysterious murderer stalking France and the presence of the famed investigator Henri Ducard.

This isn’t the first time that Batman has had an inner conflict when it comes to his mission of eradicating crime. Batman: Mask of the Phantasm explored the tug that Andrew Beaumont had on the Dark Knight’s heart. In this issue of Batman: The Knight, Zdarsky takes a similar path by exploring how Bruce’s teenage hormones affect his worldview. More than that, Zdarsky shows that Bruce is a far cry from the man who will strike fear into the hearts of Gotham City’s criminals. His stealth leaves much to be desired, he can’t stop the Grey Shadow from picking his pockets, and an encounter with the French police leads to him getting shot in the leg. I honestly like this, as it shows that even Batman has some growing pains he needed to overcome.

Di Giandomenico renders France in stunning detail, from its brilliantly lit buildings to its bustling cafes. He also draws panel after panel of Bruce leaping from rooftop to rooftop. And even though the young Wayne is lacking the cape and cowl that will define his alter ego, it’s still an impressive sight. The standout, though, is the Grey Shadow – or Lucie, as Bruce comes to know her. True to her namesake, she is clad in a form-fitting grey jumpsuit with red goggles that resemble an owl’s eyes, and carries a selection of throwing daggers. It’s not hard to see why Bruce falls for her and given his later relationship with Selina Kyle, it’s clear the man has a type.

Rounding out the artistic team is Plascencia on colors, as he shrouds most of the issue in greys and deep dark blue. The only sources of light are the purplish-blue night sky and the twinkling of lights in the distance. In contrast, scenes set in the day have a warm glow, and the setting of the sun leads to a reddish-orange glow that permeates a few panels. Brosseau puts the majority of characters’ dialogue within parentheses to signify their speaking French; only once does Bruce slip back into his native English.

Batman: The Knight #2 continues to explore the Dark Knight’s younger years, as he deals with the pitfalls of adolescence and grand larceny in Paris. With the ending featuring an appearance from one of Batman’s most famous mentors, Bruce clearly still has some growing pains he needs to work through.

Batman: The Knight #2 is available wherever comics are sold.

 


Batman: The Knight #2
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TL;DR

Batman: The Knight #2 continues to explore the Dark Knight’s younger years, as he deals with the pitfalls of adolescence and grand larceny in Paris. With the ending featuring an appearance from one of Batman’s most famous mentors, Bruce clearly still has some growing pains he needs to work through.