REVIEW: ‘Superman: Son of Kal-El,’ Issue #8

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Superman: Son of Kal-El #8

The Leviathan is nearing Metropolis! Will Superman and Jackson Hyde (AKA Aquaman) be able to calm it down in time? Or will Bendix’s Gamorra Corps, who are attempting to kill the poor creature, make things worse? Superman: Son of Kal-El #8 is written by Tom Taylor, with pencils by Cian Tormey, inks by Raül Fernandez, colors by Federico Blee, cover by Dan Mora, variant cover by Travis Moore and Tamra Bonvillain, and letters by Dave Sharpe. It is published by DC Comics.

Even though this is part 2 to the previous story started in the last issue, Taylor writes a tight and focused conclusion that feels like it can stand on its own. The tone is rightfully sorrowful and stressful as Jon and his allies do their best to stop the Leviathan, who is otherwise an innocent creature that human-made climate change has disturbed and protect the residents of Metropolis. Taylor makes a great and compelling predicament for Jon, putting pressure on him from all sides and making it all the more stressful for the reader to empathize and sympathize with our burgeoning Superman. In that, this story is masterfully done.

Even so, it could have gone further in the climate change message by being more explicit about how corporate entities are the primary cause for it and bear responsibility. It is rich capitalists like Bendrix and Luthor that are the primary cause for so many of the harms ravaging our earth. But Taylor makes sure that implication is still there, at least, and that it is in people like Jon, Jackson, and Jon’s boyfriend Jay that should inspire us to make a difference in our messed-up world. I hope in a future issue we can see him go the full route on this aspect.

The art by Tormey, Fernandez, and Blee is fantastic. Tormey does a great job of including so much detail, making the epic feel intimate, especially in the ocean scenes and Jon’s facial expressions. Fernandez’s inks add a deep sheen, especially to the water, as Blee uses every shade of blue he can. The colors pop everywhere in this issue and immerse you further in the grand scale that the artists are able to achieve here.

Sharpe’s letters are overall very good and are appropriately not overelaborate, adding to the mood of the comic being more melancholy than usual. It’s a great finishing touch to a fantastic issue.

Superman: Son of Kal-El #8 is one of the most compelling stories for Jon Kent so far, as it forces our young Superman to make tough choices in pursuit of doing the right thing. Taylor writes a tight and focused story, Tormey, Fernandez, and Blee make stunning artwork, and Sharpe’s lettering is the last fine pointed touch for this story. Jon learns some hard lessons that he’ll take with him going forward, and it’s great to see him go through that sort of development. It’ll be very interesting to see where the story goes from here.

Superman: Son of Kal-El #8 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Superman: Son of Kal-El #8
4.5

TL;DR

Superman: Son of Kal-El #8 is one of the most compelling stories for Jon Kent so far, as it forces our young Superman to make tough choices in pursuit of doing the right thing. Taylor writes a tight and focused story, Tormey, Fernandez, and Blee make stunning artwork and Sharpe’s lettering is the last fine pointed touch for this story.