REVIEW: ‘Justice League Incarnate,’ Issue #4

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Justice League Incarnate #4

Justice League Incarnate #4 is written by Joshua Willamson and Dennis Culver, illustrated by Chris Burnham (pages 1-10), Mike Norton (pages 11-23), and Andrei Bressan (pages 24-30), colored by Hi-Fi, and lettered by Tom Napolitano. It’s published by DC Comics. “Worlds Collide” picks up after the events of Justice League Incarnate #3 and reveals the malevolent force that Justice League Incarnate has been battling to stop, and it’s tied to their very first mission. To make matters worse, the Multiverse’s only hope may lie in Darkseid.

The first half of the issue is dedicated to recapping the various multiversal events that have befallen the DC Universe, including Crisis on Infinite Earths and Dark Knights: Death Metal. On the one hand, this recap is essential, especially when it comes to The Multiversity, as that story both serves as the origin for JL Incarnate and has ties to the threat they now face. However, on the other hand, I feel that Williamson and Culver could have broken up the history lesson for better pacing. As a result, the first half of the issue plays out as a history lecture for the DC Universe, while the second half is more or less set up for the big finale.

However, the second half has some great moments, including a crisis of confidence for Doctor Multiverse and one member of the team making the ultimate sacrifice. I won’t spoil what character undergoes said sacrifice, but it both fits the character and serves as a solid beginning to their next adventure. Williamson and Culver also reunite the team, with Avery Ho finally accepting the mantle of the Flash and President Superman refusing to bow in the face of Darkseid’s army.

The art team continues to divide up their duties based on the different Earths that both heroes and villains inhabit. Burnham illustrates the first half of the issue, paying homage to the various Crisis events—even the first page is a direct homage to Crisis on Infinite Earths! He also draws the most terrifying version of Darkseid I’ve ever seen; the Lord of Apokolips towers over everyone he encounters and is mostly wrapped in shadow, with his burning red eyes being the only pinprick of light. Norton handles a good deal of the second half, and Bressan steps in for the home stretch with a page that hints at the battle yet to come.

Topping off the issue are Hi-Fi and Napolitano, whose color work and lettering play into the dichotomy between light and shadow, a dichotomy that is brought up throughout the issue. Whole panels consist of nothing but inky darkness, with the only light being the pure white letters detailing the countless deaths and rebirths the Multiverse has suffered. And quite fittingly, JL Incarnate’s members are the only source of light in the universe due to their brighter costumes, which serve as a great contrast to Darkseid’s all-black ensemble.

Justice League Incarnate #4 revisits the past and present of the DC Universe to set up its finale, which very well could affect the future of DC’s heroes. With one issue left in the series, I look forward to how the second part of Williamson’s “Infinite” saga wraps up.

Justice League Incarnate #4 is available wherever comics are sold.


Justice League Incarnate #4 
4

TL;DR

Justice League Incarnate #4 revisits the past and present of the DC Universe to set up its finale, which very well could affect the future of DC’s heroes. With one issue left in the series, I look forward to how the second part of Williamson’s “Infinite” saga wraps up.