REVIEW: ‘Teen Titans Academy,’ Issue #10

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Teen Titans Academy #10 - But Why Tho

After the fiasco of the Homecoming dance in the previous issue, the Titans learn they have a dire choice to make. One that could fundamentally break the foundations of their academy, but one they may be forced to do for the sake of the world. Teen Titans Academy #10 is published by DC Comics and written by Tim Sheridan, with art by Mike Norton, Tom Derenick and Norton on pencils and inks, colors by Alex Sinclair and Jeremiah Skipper, letters by Rob Leigh, cover by Rafa Sandoval and Alejandro Sánchez, and variant cover by Fico Ossio.

This issue deals with the moral quandaries of the Titans deliberating how they should defeat one of their students, Dane. He not only ran away with Red X, but also turns out to be the Anti-Christ that will bring about the Apocalypse, as they learn from Shazam. Sheridan does a good job of making the stakes feel extremely dire while making the reader empathize with the Titans as they discuss their contingencies, and involve Stitch in the mix as a voice of reason. Even though the turn of the story feels a bit random, and would likely make more sense by reading the Shazam series, it still makes sense enough to be compelling to readers.

On the flip side, we see Dane discuss his situation with Red X as they’ve escaped to 1890 Arizona where Dane was born. We get to learn more about Dane in his conversations with Red X on the utility of being part of Teen Titans Academy. It’s a good conversation that builds on the themes of the series laid out by Sheridan, getting the students to question the authority of the academy and make their own decisions, all while facing some hellhounds on the way. The increasing interiority we see in Red X is great, as is getting to learn more about Dane as a character, almost certainly making what we’ll see in the next few issues even more heartbreaking and devastating.

Norton’s art remains fantastic as always, as he does a particularly great job of conveying the various characters’ anguish and stress with their expressions. There’s not a lot of action here. Like in the previous issue, it’s intimate and reflective, even as the end of the world may be upon our heroes. The issue is unique with its coloring by both Sinclair and Skipper, each taking the two main settings with different characters. Sinclair immerses readers with the dark reds in the hellish landscape of Dane and Red X, while Skipper keeps the typical bright and vibrant colors of the academy, creating a great contrast. The pencils and inks by Derenick in the first several pages also add a haunting opener for this dire issue. Leigh’s lettering is great as always. In this issue, he particularly excels at giving texture to and coloring the text bubbles and enhancing the personalities of the characters speaking. It all makes for an even more engaging read.

Teen Titans Academy #10 is a contemplative pause before the hellish storm that awaits the academy. Sheridan does a great job of giving interiority to all the characters, The art by Norton, Sinclair, Skipper, and Derenick is all fantastic, allowing all of them to give their own distinctive mark, and Leigh’s lettering is gives it the final touch of personality. I don’t know where exactly the Teen Titans Academy is going from here, but it will be very intriguing to find out.

Teen Titans Academy #10 is available wherever comics are sold.


Teen Titans Academy #10
4

TL;DR

Teen Titans Academy #10 is a contemplative pause before the hellish storm that awaits the academy. Sheridan does a great job of giving interiority to all the characters, The art by Norton, Sinclair, Skipper, and Derenick is all fantastic, allowing all of them to give their own distinctive mark, and Leigh’s lettering is gives it the final touch of personality. I don’t know where exactly the Teen Titans Academy is going from here, but it will be very intriguing to find out.