REVIEW: ‘Harley Quinn,’ Issue #10

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Harley Quinn #10 - But Why Tho

Harley Quinn #10 is published by DC Comics. Written by Stephanie Phillips. The artist is Laura Braga. The colours are by Arif Prianto and the letterer is Deron Bennett. 

Harley and Ivy are back together enjoying each other’s company. But a lot has happened in Quinn’s life that her lover is not aware of. She’s back in Gotham, as well as a hero. They are invited to a museum for a double date with Kevin and Same. But this romantic adventure may not be as harmonious as expected. Elsewhere, Strange and Keepsake have a meeting.

This is a very important issue, as a new status quo has begun. So much of Phillips’ series up to now has been centred on Harley searching for Ivy. She has her back, so now what? Harley Quinn #10 features a transition between arcs. It moves slowly but pleasantly—the reader simply enjoying the situation. All of the issues in this series feel long, so you are able to lose yourself in the world. There isn’t much action, but there is so much happening it doesn’t matter. The writer replaces the action with deep and powerful drama. The jumps between serious and comedy aren’t too jarring, blending perfectly. The final act is painful in the best way, with a truly heartbreaking ending.

The characters and the dialogue within Harley Quinn are so incredible. Through their journey, we are left desperate for them to be okay. Phillips’ understanding of the relationship between Ivy and Harley is stunning. But these two have changed. The before and after of where Harley once was is seen by where Ivy is. It leads to some tense moments. And yet, the devotion they have for each other is blissful to read. The exploration of love in this series is pure and unabashed, recognising its power. The dialogue is a flawless combination of prose and script, achingly emotional with a real sense of voice. The cast has always been small, allowing for their personalities to be bigger than themselves.

The art is just as beautiful. Braga is an exceptional artist, and very different from Rossmo. When Braga provided art on a previous Harley issue, the characters drawn had existed in other comics and therefore had been seen under different art styles. But figures such as Kevin and Keepsake have been almost exclusive to Harley Quinn. It is fascinating to see how another artist interprets them. Braga draws each beautifully, using their own style to still capture what has endeared readers to them. Kevin’s size and jovial demeanour still remain crucial to his character. As for Harley and Ivy, they look classically beautiful. The design of their outfits showcases a wonderful knowledge of fashion and how it can be used to build character development.

The colours are fantastic. The buildings and landscapes in the panes are often a duller colour. Still lovely to look at, with cool blues and greys being used frequently. But the really vibrant tones and shades are left to bless the characters. Whether it be the jade skin of Ivy, Harley’s brilliant red, or the purple of Sam’s hair, it makes the issue a visually delightful experience.

The lettering is also very well done. There is a lot of dialogue in this comic, yet the text and the layout of the word balloons are always so easy to read.

Harley Quinn #10 is a love story to rival the greatest. This appears to be a transition issue between arcs, but it is in no way filler. There are incredibly important events that occur in this chapter that will change the course of many series to come. Phillips’ dialogue is so engaging to read, the art is fantastic, and the notion that they care about these characters is evident.

Harley Quinn #10 is available where comics are sold.


Harley Quinn #10
5

TL;DR

Harley Quinn #10 is a love story to rival the greatest. This appears to be a transition issue between arcs, but it is in no way filler. There are incredibly important events that occur in this chapter that will change the course of many series to come. Phillips’ dialogue is so engaging to read, the art is fantastic, and the notion that they care about these characters is evident.