ADVANCED REVIEW: ‘Wastelanders: Hawkeye,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Wastelanders Hawkeye #1 - But Why Tho

Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Ethan Sacks, art by Ibraim Roberson, colors by Dijjo Lima, and letters by Corey Petit. As one of the few heroes that survived the day the villains won, Hawkeye has struggled to survive in the harsh Wasteland as he searches to avenge his fallen comrades. But some still believe he can become more than a wandering force of vengeance.

Do you know what’s possibly the hardest thing to say in a review? That something is just fine. Trying to expound upon how something manages to deliver an adequate piece of media, without making the subject sound better or worse than it really is can be a huge struggle as a reviewer. And, as you might have guessed, it is a struggle I’m having right now with Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1.

Our story picks up with Clint Barton as he arrives in a town to face off with Marco the Terrible. While this confrontation doesn’t quite go the way Clint had envisioned, he manages to come out the other side no worse for wear thanks to some timely intervention by his old master Matt Murdock. Murdock takes Clint back to his sanctuary to prepare him for a mission that will hopefully teach the anger-fueled bowman one final lesson.

In its effort to be appealing, Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1 leans most heavily on Clint’s often annoying personality. While this mildly abrasive personality he has become known for can be entertaining, a story needs more than Clint being Clint to make it really good. Unfortunately, this story doesn’t strive for much beyond being a vehicle for Barton’s personality. And we are getting to the point where the character is feeling more and more like a caricature of himself as more stories lean into the archer’s ability to annoy those around him.

Beyond Clint, the supporting cast of Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1 brings some interesting takes on some of Marvel’s classic characters. I enjoyed these alternative versions of these characters thoroughly. With comic book characters generally never aging, it is always interesting to see how creatives see these personalities in their “golden years.”

The art in this book does a good job of delivering the harshness of the Wasteland. The world always looks like it has been through a lot and the characters are always designed to match it. Everything that is seen in this book reflects the rundown design that encompasses this possible future world.

The color work throughout the book does a good job of highlighting the atmosphere of the Wasteland. From the harsh yellows of the sun-baked days to the chilling blues of the cloudless nights, Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1 is always bathed in the appropriate light and colors.

Rounding out the book’s presentation is its lettering. The letters here do a good job of guiding the reader through the book’s story.

So, while Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1 never really wows me, it isn’t bad either. If you are looking for a story that plays heavily into Hawkeye’s trademark ability to annoy those around him this might land well for you. If, however, you need something more than this one note to make a comic worth reading, you might want to give this one a pass.

Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1 is available on December 22nd wherever comics are sold.


Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1
3

TL;DR

While Wastelanders: Hawkeye #1 never really wows me, it isn’t bad either. If you are looking for a story that plays heavily into Hawkeye’s trademark ability to annoy those around him this might land well for you. If, however, you need something more than this one note to make a comic worth reading, you might want to give this one a pass.