REVIEW: ‘Radio Apocalypse,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Radio Apocalypse #1 - But Why Tho

Radio Apocalypse #1 is written by Ram V, illustrated by Anand RK, colored by Anisha Shankar, and lettered by Aditya Bidikar. It is published by Vault Comics. In the near future, an asteroid strike has ravaged the Earth, leaving humanity to gather in settlements. One of these settlements, Bakerstown, contains the last remaining radio station where messages are broadcast to the inhabitants along with other survivors. As more survivors advance upon Bakerstown, including young couple Tan and Cali along with thief Rion, Radio Apocalypse stands as a beacon in the night-broadcasting music and warding off the horrors of the new world.

Ram V is fast becoming one of the most interesting writers in the comic book industry, having launched a new Venom run in addition to his horror-based work at DC. Here he slowly reveals details about this new world, most importantly via characters. The three major characters we meet have a different set of goals; Tan and Cali are trying to find sanctuary as Cali’s suffering from a twisted angle and Rion only steals because he was kicked out of his former settlement. When they get to Bakerstown, readers will learn more about the world of the comic, including the mysterious threat that its inhabitants fight against The AfterShock Comics series Scout’s Honor took a similar approach, revealing more about its main character Kit as it went on; I trust V to do the same with his eclectic cast of characters, including Radio Apocalypse’s resident DJ.

It’s RK’s art that provides the biggest draw of the comic. His angular, looping art style is both a departure from the artists I’m used to and helps sell the horror elements of the book—especially the monstrous “Xions” that prowl the night. These creatures look like something out of a John Carpenter movie; all twisted innards and multiple eyes. Shankar brings a post-apocalyptic vibe to RK’s art with her colorwork as well, with various neon hues bringing a haunting vibe to the book, especially during the scenes set at night. And keeping in line with the abstractness of the art, Bidikar’s word balloons are a bit wobbly and feature letters that look like handwriting.

Perhaps the other biggest draw of Radio Apocalypse is the fact that readers are encouraged to listen along to the songs played throughout the comic. V says he wrote the series while listening to music, and that music influences certain scenes. A particularly tragic scene involves the use of Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire,” when a character facing death says she used to listen to the song with her father. Listening to the song while reading the scene really gave it the kick the creators were intending. It makes one wonder what other songs influenced the creation of this series.

Radio Apocalypse #1 puts its own spin on the end of the world, mixing a killer soundtrack with sci-fi and horror elements. If you’re looking for a new series to read or a new take on the post-apocalyptic genre, I definitely recommend giving this series a look and curating a new playlist with each issue.

Radio Apocalypse #1 is available wherever comics are sold.


Radio Apocalypse #1
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TL;DR

Radio Apocalypse #1 puts its own spin on the end of the world, mixing a killer soundtrack with sci-fi and horror elements. If you’re looking for a new series to read or a new take on the post-apocalyptic genre, I definitely recommend giving this series a look and curating a new playlist with each issue.