REVIEW: ‘Robins,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Robins #1

Robins #1 is published by DC Comics, written by Tim Seeley, art by Baldemar Rivas, colors by Romulo Fajardo Jr., and letters by Steve Wands.  Over the 80+ years of the character’s existence, the mantle of Robin has been worn by several folks. Whether it’s the dynamic acrobat Dick Grayson, the computer-hacking Tim Drake, or the short-lived adventures of Stephanie Brown, the mantle of Robin has come to mean something unique to each of its wearers. But today they have all come together to ask one seemingly simple question. Was their becoming Robin a good thing?

That accepting the mantle of Batman’s sidekick profoundly changed the lives of each individual that has worn it is a given. But that Robins #1 asks if it was a good thing is an interesting question. Given that one Robin died, another lost a parent, and a third was beaten nearly to death, whether or not the name is worth the price they pay is a fairer question than it might seem at first glance. Especially when you couple all the hurt with the lack of progress cities like Gotham and Bludhaven have seen despite the presence of these caped crusaders.

While this issue asks the question, it leaves the answer for future installments. Instead, Seeley utilizes this issue more like a reintroduction to the basics of each Robin’s origins, as well as opening the book with a fun combat moment that helps highlight the contrasts in each character’s approach to fighting crime. This focus on character gives the book a lot of energy, even as it only scratches the surface of its main narrative.

Bot no comic could see such a gathering of heroes as Robins #1 does without an insidious plan by a shadowy villain. As is fitting for the book’s title, this threat seems to be bringing back the past as the unfolding plot touches the histories of many of the Robins. Too little is revealed to have any sort of firm grasp on where the story may yet go, but there is potential in what is revealed.

The art in this book does a good job of building the vibrant energy of its moments and cast. This is doubly true for the opening fight sequence. Artist Rivas does a great job of highlighting how different and sometimes similar, the various Robins can be in this opening.

The other highlight from the art is how willing Rivas is to put the reader right in the middle of what’s going on. When the Robins retire to discuss their past, Rivas always places the point of view for each frame where it will give the maximum impact.

All this energy and emotion is further amplified by the colorist Fajardo’s vibrant colorwork. Lots of bright colors help make all the superhero action and passionate discussion pop off the page.

Rounding out the book’s presentation is Wands’s proficient lettering. The letters deliver the story in a clear and easy-to-follow style that guides the reader effortlessly through the narrative.

When all is said and done, Robins #1 gets the latest adventure of Batman’s many sidekicks off to an interesting start. If the creative team can successfully build upon the foundation they have laid out here; this could certainly be an adventure worthy of the assembled Robins.

Robins #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Robins #1
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, Robins #1 gets the latest adventure of Batman’s many sidekicks off to an interesting start. If the creative team can successfully build upon the foundation they have laid out here; this could certainly be an adventure worthy of the assembled Robins.