REVIEW: ‘My Bad,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

My Bad #1

My Bad #1 is published by AHOY Comics, written by Mark Russel, Bryce Ingman, and Scott Morse, with art by Peter Krause, Mark Russel, and Joe Orsak, colors by Kelly Fitzpatrick and Paul Little, and letters by Rob Steen. Welcome to a new world of superheroes! A world where the dark corners of Gravel City are illuminated by the just light of The Chandelier, and no traffic crime goes unthwarted by Rush Hour. But where heroes are willing to do justice, so to will there be villains who will rise to face them.

As the previous paragraph hinted at, My Bad #1 is a bit of a spoof on all things superhero. From introducing readers to comical takes on some classics in the genre to even recreating the old-timey ads, this book endeavors to poke a bit of fun at the staple comic book genre. While it does manage to elicit a chuckle or two, everything is not as fun as it could be on the mean streets of Gravel City.

Sometimes an old joke can be made fresh again with a new twist—a punchline that can catch the recipient off guard enough that the laughter once lost to overuse returns. But other times, that twist just isn’t enough. The familiar trappings of the joke are just too much for the fresh take to overcome. This is the primary struggle that My Bad #1 encounters. Despite telling some new stories, the ground they tread just feels too familiar to land with the force they need.

The brightest spot in this book’s anthology of stories is easily its opening tale focused on The Chandelier. An obvious Batman parody, The Chandelier delivers justice to the mean streets of his city in a package that feels a bit more believable. Selfish, entitled, and overbearing, The Chandelier feels far more like a rich billionaire than Bruce Wayne ever has. When he receives a mysterious package from one of his arch-enemies, Russel’s writing does its best to bring out a few laughs at the hero’s attempts to learn the contents of the mysterious parcel.

The remainder of My Bad #1 goes a bit downhill from here. While I would never call any of the book’s stories bad, the remainder of the issue’s 32 pages never managed to elicit any laughter from me either. Unfortunately, the goofy and often dysfunctional characters feel like they should be able to land a couple of laughs but fail to get there.

The art throughout this issue does a solid job of creating the feel of classic comics without apeing the exact style of linework employed in early comic books. While the lines themselves feel a bit more modern, the art creates the feel of old-time comics with the arrangement of characters in the panels and the reader’s viewpoints. The coloring further reinforces this aesthetic by keeping the palette fairly simple, which helps create the familiar feel of the comics of yore.

Wrapping up this book’s presentation is a proficient delivery of the letters. The straightforward lettering feels right at home with the rest of the book’s design, helping it mesh smoothly with the art.

So, when all is said and done, My Bad #1 delivers a bit of fun as it takes a few light-hearted jabs at the comic book medium. While it didn’t land for me, comedy is the most subjective of art forms. So, if you are looking for a giggle or two at the expense of cape-wearing heroes and maniacal villains, you might want to give it a try.

My Bad #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.


My Bad #1
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TL;DR

My Bad #1 delivers a bit of fun as it takes a few light-hearted jabs at the comic book medium. While it didn’t land for me, comedy is the most subjective of art forms. So, if you are looking for a giggle or two at the expense of cape-wearing heroes and maniacal villains, you might want to give it a try.