REVIEW: ‘The Death of Doctor Strange,’ Issue #2

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The Death of Doctor Strange #2

The Death of Doctor Strange #2 is written by Jed MacKay, illustrated by Lee Garbett, colored by Antonio Fabela, and lettered by VC’s Cory Petit. It is published by Marvel Comics. Following the end of the first issue, Doctor Strange—true to the series’ title—is dead. But before his death, the Sorcerer Supreme locked away a piece of his timeline, which takes the form of his younger self. The younger Doctor Strange intends to solve his own murder, but he encounters the Three Mothers—a trio of witches whose power has caused other magical beings to flee their dimensions and head to Earth.

The first issue dealt with all of the connections that Doctor Strange had with others before his death, so it only makes sense that this issue would reverse that train of thought with Young Doctor Strange. He expresses surprise at the fact that he was married, and he makes grand pronouncements using words such as “lickspittle” and “zounds.” MacKay has researched how Strange was portrayed during his early appearances; he even brings back Strange’s old rival Baron Mordo and his lackey Kaecilius. He also introduces a new threat in the form of the Three Mothers, who can hold off Strange and the Avengers.

The Three Mothers are an utterly horrifying sight to behold, thanks to Garbett, who dedicates a double-page spread to their first appearance. The Wyrd is a priestess who looks alien in every sense of the word; her face is gaunt and pale, and in place of eyes, strange sigils are carved into her face. The Crown is a massive warrior clad from head to toe in red and black armor; massive spikes jut out from her shoulder pads, and the majority of her face is covered by a helmet with curving horns. The Crawling is perhaps the most grotesque of all; she is a writhing mass of pink worms, with a statue’s head attached to the top. Even their word balloons have an otherworldly feel thanks to Petit; the Wyrd speaks in halting sentences depicted in golden light, and the Crawling has red, twisted word balloons similar to Carnage.

Topping off the artistic team is Fabela on color art, who continues to bring a bright array of colors to the scene-an effect that only highlights the horror of the Three Mothers. Young Strange is clad in his classic garb, which includes a blue tunic decorated with a white cross-like symbol and a matching cloak. Even his magic is depicted as bluish-white energy, offering a contrast to Thor’s white-hot lightning and Captain Marvel’s energy blasts. Another double-page spread is a visual feast for the eyes, featuring Strange and the Avengers battling the Three Mothers in the streets of New York.

The Death of Doctor Strange #2 explores the Sorcerer Supreme’s demise and introduces a new trio of magical threats in the process. While the mystery behind Strange’s death has yet to be solved, the threat of the Three Mothers has escalated the stakes, and I look forward to seeing their continuing role in the series.

The Death of Doctor Strange #2 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 


The Death of Doctor Strange #2
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TL;DR

The Death of Doctor Strange #2 explores the Sorcerer Supreme’s demise and introduces a new trio of magical threats in the process. While the mystery behind Strange’s death has yet to be solved, the threat of the Three Mothers has escalated the stakes, and I look forward to seeing their continuing role in the series.