ADVANCED REVIEW: ‘A Thing Called Truth,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

A Thing Called Truth #1

A Thing Called Truth #1 is published by Image Comics, written by Iolanda Zanfardino, with art by Elisa Romboli. Doctor Magdalene Traumer is a hard-working scientist that has sacrificed a lot for her pursuits. But now, she is on the cusp of a discovery that could change the planet. At least until the corporation she works for goes and screws everything up for her.

Corporate greed is the worst. The way corporations systematically happily use, abuse, and grind into dust anyone they need to in order to raise their profit margins never fails to anger anyone with an ethical fiber in their being. Not only do they chew up and spit out employees on the regular, but how so many will happily exploit human misery in the name of their shareholders only further causes the vile to rise in one’s throat. I know Dr. Traumer would certainly agree after the day she has in the opening pages of A Thing Called Truth #1.

The first impression writer Zanfardino delivers of Dr. Traumer is incredibly positive. As the doctor is hard at work in her laboratory, we see her making a scientific breakthrough that could change the world for the better. However, her thrill about this potential breakthrough comes from what appears to be purely altruistic motives. Desiring to see the world improved, the doctor’s enthusiasm never once seems to stem from what this discovery could mean for her on any level, let alone financial.

This glowing first impression makes what comes next for Traumer’s professional career all the harder to see. When the dust settles, our wonderful protagonist decides to indulge in one of the most time-honored traditions when the world has given you the royal screw job. She decides to get blind, stinking drunk. The doctor’s moment of alcohol-fueled outrage is a wonderful blend of humor and charm. Traumer’s rage against the machine is perfectly written by Zanfardino to be humorous and poignant all at once. When the bartender finally has enough of Traumer’s shenanigans and gives her the boot, what comes next will undoubtedly take our protagonist to places she could not have expected.

All the energy and charm of A Thing Called Truth #1‘s moments are delivered wonderfully through Romboli’s art. From the book’s opening hopefulness to the surprising ending, the art never fails not only to bring the story to visual life but manages to gift it with so much exuberance that I’m often surprised the panels of the book can contain it.

While the line art lays the groundwork for the story’s energy, the palette furthers this book’s presentation beautifully with vibrant and appealing colors. There is also a significant amount of contrast throughout the book’s colors. Although each scene is mainly bathed in hues of a singular color, each of the story’s moments stands out from all the others.

The final piece of the book’s presentation is the lettering, which does a magnificent job making sure the tale’s energy comes through in visualizing the various characters’ voices. In addition, the text designs used give a final nudge of energy that puts the story over the top.

When all is said and done, A Thing Called Truth #1 starts its narrative off in a way that is filled with energy, promise, and fun. Where the tale goes from here is wide open, but if the quality of the story can live up to this book’s promise, it’ll be an adventure well worth going on.

A Thing Called Truth #1 is available for purchase on November 3rd wherever comics are sold.


A Thing Called Truth #1
4.5

TL;DR

A Thing Called Truth #1 starts its narrative off in a way that is filled with energy, promise, and fun. Where the tale goes from here is wide open, but if the quality of the story can live up to this book’s promise, it’ll be an adventure well worth going on.