REVIEW: ‘Champions,’ Issue #10

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Champions #10

Champions #10 is published by Marvel Comics. Written by Danny Lore with art by Luciano Vecchio. The colour artist is Frederico Blee and the letters are by Clayton Cowles. The ‘Killer App’ arc has seen members of the Champions go inside Roxxon’s app company, trying to find out their mission. Part of the evil corporation’s plan was to maintain Kamala’s Law, banning teenage superheroes from fighting crime or using their powers. Struggling to penetrate the company, Nova offered Roxxon Kamala Khan as a celebrity endorsement without her consent. Kamala was placed on a stage and told to speak on behalf on the company. Instead, she openly denounced them, defeating their villains and launching a Champions app all at the same time. Kamala’s Law was repealed, with Roxxon exposed. With one last plan, Andre Simms unleashes an army of giant robots out of the building.

With the Law revoked, the Champions are now free to act as heroes in public again. Initially relishing their ability to do good, their first task is to battle the legion of crowd control robots. Armed with nonlethal weapons, that does not mean that they aren’t dangerous. The Champions fight the mechanical behemoths, realizing that their youth and connection to the Roxxon app puts them in more danger. Meanwhile, Miriam, the head of Roxxon, confronts Simms at the source of the control. 

There is a massive feeling of both relief and release in Champions #10. For so many issues, our young heroes have been acting in secret, diminished, and deflated. When undercover, they have had to be quiet and careful. Now, in this issue, there is a group of heroes fighting giant robots. Perhaps the most cliched concept there is in a superhero comic. But it is refreshing here because the characters are allowed to do this. They are doing what the Champions have always been about, protecting innocents and standing up for young people.

Each of these issues feels full of content, well worth their money. The pacing and structure of Lore’s writing are superb. Split between two locations, the battle still feels intrinsically connected to the themes involved throughout the series. The ending does wrap up this particular arc but leaves a cliffhanger that suggests that there is much more to come.

Regarding themes, Lore and the Champions may be one of the most relevant comic books on the market. The writer addresses powerful themes that are acute to right now. Social media has been utilized before, but nowhere close to the specificity of the ‘Killer App’ arc has unraveled it. How social media manipulates narratives, how it tracks speech, and learns how users communicate. How corporations can use it to spin stories to their benefit. Lore brings countless small themes and places them under one umbrella. But there are clever little jibes that also fit present times, such as a comment about how dangerous nonlethal weaponry can be.

The dialogue and the characters are sublime in Champions #10. Character arcs are given epilogues. The most beautiful relationship that Lore has nurtured is Nova and Ms Marvel. It is important to note that Eve L. Ewing gave these two love as well, but Sam has grown and evolved since then. Their little chats are in-depth, eloquent and stunning. The way they are structured places this duo as close confidants, and it is so lovely to read. All of these characters are so easy to love and stay attached to. Another powerful figure in this book is Miriam. In one monologue, she suddenly becomes this terrifying, unpredictable villain who could remain a danger for the Champions and other young heroes.

The art is brilliant. There is so much fun within this issue, and Vecchio channels this like a composer. The battle is terrifically constructed, large, and exciting. The Champions can use their powers with freedom and exhilaration. The robots look awesome and there is a great sensation of liveliness throughout the comic. The main characters look happier with highly expressive faces.

The colours are stunning. Blee has kept the bright, vibrant colours present in every chapter of this arc, which has continued into this action-packed comic. These colours are present on the robots, on their surroundings, in the technology. Ultimately, it creates a positive and inviting atmosphere for the reader.

Cowles uses SFX frequently as part of the excitement. The lettering is well designed. The text in the word balloons is very easy to read, and the custom balloons for certain characters increase the dynamism of the text.

Champions #10 is a wonderful comic. Not just the end of one arc, the relief from this issue stems to before the start of Outlawed. Lore has told a story absolutely brimming with heart, emotion and thematic relevance. Some of the statements and moments within this comic are so powerful they are like a gut punch. These characters have felt alive and full of souls, and the reader finishes every issue caring deeply for each of them. Whatever comes next for the Champions is eagerly awaited.

Champions #10 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Champions #10
5

TL;DR

Champions #10 is a wonderful comic. Not just the end of one arc, the relief from this issue stems to before the start of Outlawed. Lore has told a story absolutely brimming with heart, emotion, and thematic relevance. Some of the statements and moments within this comic are so powerful they are like a gut punch. These characters have felt alive and full of souls, and the reader finishes every issue caring deeply for each of them. Whatever comes next for the Champions is eagerly awaited.