REVIEW: ‘Inferno,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Inferno #1

Inferno #1 is written by Jonathan Hickman, illustrated by Valerio Schiti, colored by David Curiel, and lettered by VC’s Joe Sabino. It is published by Marvel Comics. Years ago, the precognitive mutant Destiny attacked geneticist Moira MacTaggart and revealed Moira’s mutant heritage while challenging her to do better. In the present day, the X-Men and their fellow mutants have managed to form a nation on the island of Krakoa. Yet, they are beset with multiple threats, including the anti-mutant organization known as Orchis and Mystique, who seeks to resurrect Destiny against Moira’s wishes.

This issue marks Hickman’s final X-Men story (for the time being), and he chooses to start by exploring mysteries he set up two years ago in House of X and Powers of X, including the rise of the ultimate Sentinel Nimrod and the reason why precognitive mutants aren’t allowed to set foot in Krakoa. Those familiar with Hickman’s work know that he likes to play the long game, and even with this final story, that’s true; plans are hatched on both Krakoa and Orchis’ sides, and Moira takes desperate steps to make sure Destiny is not resurrected. And Hickman’s talent for repeating certain scenes comes in handy as well; the opening page is a direct homage to the first page of House of X.

The issue also features a collection of fan-favorite X-Men. From Professor X and Magneto to Nightcrawler and Kitty Pryde, and even fan favorites including Magik and Emma Frost, there’s a good chance that readers will find their favorite X-Man within the pages of this issue. House of X and Powers of X utilized a similar structure, as the revelations within that series led to the formation of the Krakoa era. Given that this is Hickman’s grand finale to his X-Men run, it makes sense that he’d want to go as epic as possible. Also adding to the epic feel of the issue is its size; it clocks in at a hefty 52 pages and moves at a steady pace, with the final pages delivering a shocking ending.

The issue also sees some of Schiti’s best artwork, as he continues to deliver the sleek futuristic style that worked wonders on S.W.O.R.D. and Empyre. An action sequence early in the book pits the members of X-Force against Nimrod, with the massive Sentinel deploying countermeasures against their mutant powers and Wolverine doing what he does best and shredding metal with his claws. The X-Men’s costumes also vary. Magneto sports both black and white versions of his trademark helmet and cape while Bishop and Cypher wear sleek jackets. Topping off the art is Curiel’s colors, which give Krakoa the look of a lush island and Orchis’ base the cold, sterile feel of a laboratory.

As with every X-Men book in the Krakoa era, there are data pages describing different events, such as a list of mutant-based incursions into the Orchis headquarters. Sabino and designer Tom Mueller make these pages look like they were fresh off the printer, with great detail paid to the layout of events. Said data pages often play a large role in setting up ongoing stories within the X-books, so readers will want to pay close attention.

Inferno #1 begins Jonathan Hickman’s final X-Men story, promising a day of reckoning for the mutant heroes. With their leadership undergoing a massive upheaval and Nimrod’s evolution into the perfect killing machine, the days of Krakoa’s paradise may be numbered. And as someone who’s been with the new X-era since House of X/Powers of X, I’m curious to see how it all ends.

Inferno #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Inferno #1
4.5

TL;DR

Inferno #1 begins Jonathan Hickman’s final X-Men story, promising a day of reckoning for the mutant heroes. With their leadership undergoing a massive upheaval and Nimrod’s evolution into the perfect killing machine, the days of Krakoa’s paradise may be numbered. And as someone who’s been with the new X-era since House of X/Powers of X, I’m curious to see how it all ends.