REVIEW: ‘X-Men: The Onslaught Revelation,’ Issue #1

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X-Men: The Onslaught Revelation #1

X-Men: The Onslaught Revelation #1 is written by Si Spurrier, illustrated by Bob Quinn, colored by Java Tartaglia, and lettered by VC’s Clayton Cowles. It is published by Marvel Comics. Onslaught, born of the darkest impulses of Charles Xavier and Magneto, has been hiding within the minds of mutants, pushing them further into suicidal influences with the intent to wipe out a great deal of Krakoa’s population. Nightcrawler and his allies, including Legion and Pixie, race to save their friends from Onslaught’s dark influence. In the process, Nightcrawler finally forms the base of his mutant religion.

This series serves as the grand finale of Way of X. What drew me to the series, other than the fact that it centered on one of my favorite X-Men, was how it approached the nature of faith. Nightcrawler, a devout Catholic, was obviously going to question how relevant his faith was in a society where the inhabitants could literally cheat death. By embracing his inner strengths, mainly his belief in the innate goodness of his fellow mutants, he is able to battle Onslaught’s manipulation. Nightcrawler also finally cracks the code to his mutant religion, with Spurrier giving birth to said religion in the form of a parable that is repeated throughout the issue.

The collection of mutants that helps Nightcrawler in his battle is an esoteric, yet engaging ensemble. Legion serves as the perfect foil to Onslaught; both of them are born of Xavier and while they have no love lost for the X-Men’s leader, Legion has mutantkind’s best interests at heart while Onslaught seeks to slaughter them. Nightcrawler’s bond with Pixie also plays an important part in the issue, as she turns out to have the means to breaking Onslaught’s hold on certain mutants. And Spurrier also has Magneto make appearances throughout the issue, which makes me happy.

Quinn and Tartaglia deliver some truly trippy imagery throughout the issue, as most of it takes place within Legion’s mind. Onslaught is shown in all his horrific glory, with a two-page spread showing him standing over the bodies of the X-Men and holding a bloody sword. He later reforms his body to look like a more corrupt version of Xavier, with Tartaglia giving him the red and purple color scheme associated with Magneto. Nightcrawler also sports a number of outfits, including a pirate getup to reflect his swashbuckling tendencies and a long flowing red rob that incorporates elements of his X-Men costume with the garments a priest might wear. Legion’s mind is constantly shifting shape; one moment it’s a pirate ship, the next it’s a swirling whirlpool as Nightcrawler conducts a sermon.

X-Men: The Onslaught Revelation #1 serves as the grand finale to the Way of X series, ending Nightcrawler’s battle with Onslaught while promising the birth of a new team. As a Kurt Wagner fan and someone who’s often pondered the nature of faith, this has capped off one of the best X-Men stories of the Krakoa era. Between this and The Death of Doctor Strange, Marvel is taking a bold approach to one of the most well-worn tropes in comics.

X-Men: The Onslaught Revelation #1 is available wherever comics are sold.

X-Men: The Onslaught Revelation #1
5

TL;DR

X-Men: The Onslaught Revelation #1 serves as the grand finale to the Way of X series, ending Nightcrawler’s battle with Onslaught while promising the birth of a new team. As a Kurt Wagner fan and someone who’s often pondered the nature of faith, this has capped off one of the best X-Men stories of the Krakoa era.