REVIEW: ‘The Flash,’ Issue #774

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Flash #774

The Flash #774 is published by DC Comics. Written by Jeremy Adams. The art is by Christian Duce. The colorist is HI-Fi, and Steve Wands is the letterer.

Wally West is alive and putting his life back together. His family is reunited, and he has a new job, working for Terrifictech. He is rejuvenated and has already defeated Heat Wave.

In this issue, Wally is taking the night off. He has a school dance to attend with Iris, his daughter. On the way to the dance, they find themselves trapped in a cloud of fog. When they arrive, everyone is trapped in slumber. Dr. Nightmare is making his way through the city and using people’s nightmares to cause havoc. With the Wests’ speed not working, Wally must think of other ways to keep his daughter safe and stop Dr. Nightmare from reaching his ultimate destination: Terrifictech.

The setup and the concept of the comic are fantastic. What is superb about the series is the down to Earth beginning. The first part of the comic is Wally wanting to go to a dance with his daughter. This is adorable and also grounds the series. So far, Wally’s new era has not contained cosmic monsters and Crises on any Earth. Instead, they have been small and intimate. But still, the stakes are high when The Flash’s family is in danger. The action and adventure of Flash are exciting, especially when their powers aren’t working. The tone of The Flash #774 is refreshing, light whilst still having moments of important drama. The ending is fantastic, with a cliffhanger ending that appears to herald the arrival of some cosmic monsters.

Something that Adams sees to consider important is the theme of family, as that is a crucial aspect of the series. The relationship between Wally and Iris is incredibly written. He is a great father, and the wholesome way he interacts with his daughter gives a brilliant positivity to the comic. The dad jokes are cringeworthy and amazing.  Iris isn’t merely a vulnerable little girl in this issue, as she has speed powers of her own. But with both not functioning, Wally becomes instantly worried about Iris, affecting how he acts. Thus, most of the good ideas are made by Iris.

As a villain, Dr. Nightmare may appear as a discount Scarecrow, but his role in The Flash #774 shows that his abilities are different and interesting. It allows for the writer and artist to get creative with what nightmares they conjure. The villain of the week concept that Adams appears to be using provides variety and unpredictability to each comic.

The art is fantastic. The transition from Will Conrad to Duce is flawless, with their art styles not being drastically different. Duce’s design of Wally may be preferred, however, as he looks more natural. The costumes and outfits in this issue are understated due to the lack of abilities. For the entirety of the issue, Wally is in a suit whilst Iris is in a pretty dress. Even Dr. Nightmare is in a lab coat and only wears a small, neatly created mask. But this in no way suggests that this issue is mundane or boring. Dr. Nightmare creates hulking beasts and monsters from the minds of his victims. Gelatinous blobs, mutated elephants, and more are awaiting the reader within the book. The varied line weights mean that Duce includes superb details in these beings.

This book is certainly colorful, which is gorgeously implemented by Hi-Fi. Something that is always eye-catching is the stark orange of both Wally and Iris’ hair, making it instantly obvious they are father and daughter. What also catches my attention is the stunning yellow of Iris’ dress, easily the brightest thing in the comic. Dr. Nightmare is often accompanied by purple, either on his creatures or in the thick fog that precedes his arrival.

The lettering is easy to read in every instance of the issue. There are frequent uses of SFX or larger word balloons, but their eligibility is never affected.

The Flash #774 is a fun and fantastic issue. Adams taps into the energy and the positivity of the silver age comics, but with modern writing styles and artwork from Duce. The superheroics that the Flash must partake in are always secondary to the importance of his family and the people around him. Wally is an extremely likable character, leaving the reader with a smile on their face whenever they see him. The art matches the positivity and the energy, resulting in exciting set pieces. 

The Flash #774 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

The Flash #774
5

TL;DR

The Flash #774 is a fun and fantastic issue. Adams taps into the energy and the positivity of the silver age comics, but with modern writing styles and artwork from Duce. The superheroics that the Flash must partake in are always secondary to the importance of his family and the people around him. Wally is an extremely likable character, leaving the reader with a smile on their face whenever they see him. The art matches the positivity and the energy, resulting in exciting set pieces.