REVIEW: ‘X-Men: The Trial of Magneto,’ Issue #2

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X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #2

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #2 is written by Leah Williams, illustrated by Lucas Werneck, colored by Edgar Delgado, and lettered by VC’s Clayton Cowles. It is published by Marvel Comics. After the events of the first issue, Magneto is under guard while Professor X probes his memories to find out if he killed the Scarlet Witch. However, trouble arrives when the Avengers land on Krakoa to take the Scarlet Witch home for burial, and Magneto soon finds himself battling Earth’s mightiest heroes as well as his fellow mutants.

Williams’ script is charged with emotion, as Wanda Maximoff meant a lot to so many people in the Marvel Universe. For the Avengers, she was a longtime teammate—and for the Vision, she was the love of his life. For Magneto, she was his daughter. And for Quicksilver, she was her brother. It’s the Quicksilver and Magneto scenes that have the most weight, as Quicksilver is wracked with anger over his sister’s passing, and Magneto is desperate to save her. In traditional Magneto fashion, it isn’t long before a fight breaks out. X-Factor also continues to play a large role in the proceedings and the newly minted team of X-Men. Not only do they have to keep the peace between the Avengers and other mutants, but they also have to keep the secret of resurrection. To Williams’ credit, this leads to one of the funniest interactions in the issue as Iron Man tries to impress Emma Frost to no avail.

The Scarlet Witch herself makes an appearance, as the circumstances of her death are thrown into question. Of course, given that we’re dealing with the realm of superheroes, this isn’t too big of a surprise. However, the issue reveals more about the nature of magic and how it both is and isn’t under people’s control. “Magic rules itself,” she says. “And mortality simply bears witness”—a line that is equal parts haunting and poignant.

Werneck draws an impressive collection of battle sequences, consisting of one-page spreads begging to be turned into posters. From the Avengers leaping into action to Polaris and Magneto have a duel with magnetic forces, each character’s power is on full display throughout the issue. Werneck also has the chance to draw Magneto in multiple outfits, including his all-black ensemble and his classic red-and-purple outfit. Delgado colors all of it in bright and vibrant hues, making Krakoa look like paradise. Character’s clothing often represents mood, and with a character like Magneto, that’s especially important. Magneto’s blood-red costume is a perfect complement to the rage that has fueled him his entire life, while his black outfit is representative of the grief he is suffering.

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #2 is packed full of emotion and action, as the Master of Magnetism wrestles with his angst as well as his fellow mutants. With a jaw-dropper of an ending and three issues left, it seems like this is one murder mystery that doesn’t fit conventions.

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #2 is available wherever comics are sold.

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #2
5

TL;DR

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #2 is packed full of emotion and action, as the Master of Magnetism wrestles with his angst as well as his fellow mutants. With a jaw-dropper of an ending and three issues left, it seems like this is one murder mystery that doesn’t fit conventions.