REVIEW: ‘Batman: Urban Legends,’ Issue #7

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Batman Urban Legends #7

Batman: Urban Legends #7 is an anthology series published by DC Comics. Unlike previous installments of the series, this issue comprises four one-shots rather than continuing any ongoing stories. However, there is an overarching theme of exploring the various future of the Dark Knight and the other men who have held his mantle.

“Wake” is set in the world of Batman Beyond; it is written by Jackson Lanzing & Collin Kelly, illustrated by Max Dunbar, colored by Sebastian Cheng, and lettered by Aditya Bidikar. “The Executive Game” features an adult Damian Wayne as Batman 666; it is written by Tim Seeley. illustrated & colored by Juan Ferreyra, and lettered by Becca Carey. “Hunter…or Hunted” returns to the world of DC Future State and chronicles Cassandra Cain’s fight to stay one step ahead of the Magistrate; it is written, illustrated, colored, and lettered by Guillaume Singelin. Finally, “The Batman With No Name” is written by Kenny Porter, illustrated by Baldemar Avas, colored by Alejandro Sanches, and lettered by Tom Napolitano.

“Wake” is the biggest story of the four, clocking in at thirty pages and serving as the major focus of the issue. In it, Bruce Wayne is mysteriously murdered, and Terry McGinnis races to solve said murder while fighting against a mysterious new force. Lanzing and Kelly are no strangers to writing futurist tales, having launched a Kang the Conqueror miniseries at Marvel and writing Star Trek: Year Five for IDW. Here they leap back and forth between two different points in time; the final conversation between Terry and Bruce and Terry’s trek through Neo-Gotham. Bruce’s death weighs heavily on Terry and causes him to shift from his usual flippant self to a more ruthless Batman-in other words, like Bruce at his prime.

Joining Lanzing and Kelly on art duties is Dunbar, who previously illustrated an Outsiders-focused story in Urban Legends. Dunbar’s animated art style fits perfectly with the cyberpunk world of Batman Beyond; he mostly draws Terry in the shadows, with Cheng’s colors highlighting the glowing white eyes and blood-red symbol that is a part of Terry’s Batsuit. Eagle-eyed fans will also notice Batman Beyond supporting characters sprinkled throughout the story, from villains like Shriek to allies like Ace the Bathound.

Out of the other stories, “Hunter…or Hunted” was the one that stood out the most to me. Future State was a surprisingly well-executed concept, and I’m glad DC is building up to events that happened in those various titles instead of treating it like a one-and-done. Singelin, best known for his graphic novel series The Grocery, brings an anime-inspired flair to his story as Cassandra navigates the streets of Gotham City. Between the heavy cloak, Cassandra wears and the mechanical design of the Magistrate’s Peacekeepers, I got some heavy Alita: Battle Angel vibes from the story. Seeley and Ferreyra return to the world of Batman 666, easily picking up where Grant Morrison and Andy Kubert left off. And “The Batman With No Name” features the most cutting edge Batman, who has the ability to change outfits that resemble various points in the Dark Knight’s history; he even has a robotic Robin!

Batman: Urban Legends #7 paints different futures for the Dark Knight but ultimately shows that no matter the era, Batman will remain a constant. With a new Batman Beyond series teased for next year, this is one of the strongest issues that Urban Legends has put out so far.

Batman: Urban Legends #7 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Batman: Urban Legends #7
4.5

TL;DR

Batman: Urban Legends #7 paints different futures for the Dark Knight but ultimately shows that no matter the era, Batman will remain a constant. With a new Batman Beyond series teased for next year, this is one of the strongest issues that Urban Legends has put out so far.