REVIEW: ‘Static: Season One,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Static Season One #3

Static: Season One #3 is written by Vita Ayala, illustrated & colored by Nikolas Draper-Ivey (pages 1-12), illustrated by ChrisCross, and colored by Wil Quintana (pages 13-20), and lettered by Andworld Design. It is published by DC Comics. “Run It Back” picks up immediately after the end of the second issue, where the police have Virgil Hawkins cornered in one of Curtis Metcalf/Hardware’s laboratories. Virgil makes a desperate escape with a collection of Metcalf’s inventions, which he uses to craft a superhero suit. Meanwhile, Hotstreak strikes a deal with the government, giving them access to a list of newly emerging metahumans.

This issue marks the first time that Draper-Ivey and ChrisCross have divided their art duties; the former artist provided finishes on the latter’s layouts for the first two issues. ChrisCross, who served as an illustrator for one of Milestone’s earlier titles, Blood Syndicate, brings the same clean lines and sense of unique design to Static that he did to that book; readers will be able to see his influence on Draper-Ivey’s work, particularly where the character design for Virgil is concerned—Virgil still has the same hairstyle and lanky build under ChrisCross. Quintana also thankfully distinguishes the Black characters in the book via their skin tones; Virgil’s skin is darker than his sister Sharon’s, and Hotstreak’s has a slightly orange glow that hints at his fire powers.

Draper-Ivey has the chance to design a new suit for Static during his half of the issue, and it looks amazing. Not only does the outfit take visual cues from Static’s original comics outfit (including his signature baseball cap), but it also feels like a suit that a bonafide science nerd would design. Static’s lightning bolt symbol looks more like a stylized S, and he trades a black and blue color scheme for a black and white one. (Ironically, Andworld Designs’ caption boxes remain blue with white lettering.) I wouldn’t be surprised if this costume starts making the rounds in the cosplay circuit, especially among Black cosplayers. I also appreciate Draper-Ivey throwing Static fans an easter egg in the shape of a younger Virgil wearing a version of his animated series outfit.

Ayala’s script, much like the artists they’re working with, is a perfect balance of action—especially where Virgil’s escape from the police is concerned-and emotional moments. While constructing his costume, Virgil thinks of all the people in his life—his father, his sister, and his friends. Later on, he has a heart-to-heart with his dad about his powers and even makes up with his friends after giving them the cold shoulder. As someone deeply connected to Static as a character and having a strong relationship with my own Dad, these scenes hit me square in the heart. A superhero’s family helps shape them: Clark Kent wouldn’t be Superman without his adoptive parents passing on their life lessons, and Peter Parker wouldn’t be Spider-Man without the influence of his Uncle Ben. In that same vein, Virgil’s family and friends have helped shape his fledgling career as Static and hopefully will continue to play a large role in his life. (A side note: I also appreciated that Virgil cites watching old anime with his dad and playing RPGs with his friends—two activities I also enjoy.)

Static: Season One #3 hits the series’ halfway point by cementing the unique bonds Virgil Hawkins has with his friends and family. The next issue promises a rematch with Hotstreak, and now that Virgil has a costume and better control of his powers, I’m eager to see how that turns out.

Static: Season One #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Static: Season One #3
5

TL;DR

Static: Season One #3 hits the series’ halfway point by cementing the unique bonds Virgil Hawkins has with his friends and family. The next issue promises a rematch with Hotstreak, and now that Virgil has a costume and better control of his powers, I’m eager to see how that turns out.