REIVEW: ‘Wonder Girl,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Wonder Girl #3

Wonder Girl #3 is published by DC Comics, written by Joelle Jones, art by Adriana Melo and Joelle Jones, colors by Jordie Bellaire, and letters by Clayton Cowles. While the flight’s touchdown might not have been as smooth as Yara had hoped, the next phase of her journey can now begin. But no sooner does she get clear of the remains of the plane when she finds herself beset by some surprising threats. Also, those who seek out Yara for their respective Amazonian allegiances continue their hunt.

While previous issues in our story established that Yara’s return to Brazil had gotten the attention of the various Amazon groups, in Wonder Girl #3, we learn that there is a local group that appears to be just as intent on acquiring the young woman. While their motives are unknown at this point, they display an impressive level of power, capable of holding their own with gods.

These individuals breathe a unique aspect into the familiar looks that writer Jones’s story has thus far delivered to fans of the Wonder Woman corner of the DC Universe. Set against the familiar style of the Greek pantheon, these beings deliver a striking visual contrast. I hope their personalities can deliver just as much variety once they are more thoroughly explored.

While Yara contends with the powers that jockey for control of her fate, Artemis and Wonder Girl(Cassie Sandsmark) find their own search for Yara slowed by enemies at every turn. Jones does a good job of bringing a bit of levity to book through the awkward interactions between the Ben-Mighdall Amazon and the Teen Titan hero. The struggles the two face dealing with each other are well crafted and entertaining.

The highlight of Wonder Girl #3, however, comes from a particularly emotional moment of choice for Yara near the end of the book. Obviously, no spoilers, but the way the moment plays out, how it is orchestrated, and the clear effect it has on Yara delivers a powerful scene that pivots the story perfectly.

The aforementioned scene serves not only as the highlight of the narrative but the art as well. While Jones and Melo deliver some amazing visual designs throughout the story, it is the emotion captured in this pivotal scene that trumps the rest of the book’s wonderful presentation.

Furthering the visual design of the book is Jones and Melo’s utilization of one of my favorite design choices in comics. Having an image cover the entire page while overlapping smaller panels over it. There is a cohesiveness to the page’s art when this technique is used that I love. It really ties it all together.

The art of Wonder Girl #3 is further elevated through the spot-on colors of Bellaire. Every scene is captured with vibrant colors thanks to the colorist’s skillful work.

Rounding out the book’s visuals are Cowles’s letters. The letterer uses several different fonts and dialogue box designs to give the various mythological creatures in the book some extra personality in their voices.

When all is said and done, Wonder Girl #3 introduces more of Yara’s ever-expanding world while setting up the next phase of her story and delivering some strong emotional moments along the way.

Wonder Girl #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Wonder Girl #3
4.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Wonder Girl #3 introduces more of Yara’s ever-expanding world while setting up the next phase of her story and delivering some strong emotional moments along the way.