REVIEW: ‘X-Men: The Trial of Magneto,’ Issue #1

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X-Men: The Trial Of Magneto #1-But Why Tho

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #1 is written by Leah Williams, illustrated by Lucas Werneck, colored by Edgar Delgado, and lettered by VC’s Clayton Cowles. It is published by Marvel Comics. Following the events of the Hellfire Gala, the Scarlet Witch has been murdered. X-Factor begins to investigate the crime scene, finding evidence that Magneto may have had a hand in her execution. While the Master of Magnetism pleads with Krakoa’s Quiet Council to resurrect the Scarlet Witch, he soon comes into conflict with his fellow mutants. But who is the true murderer? And is Wanda Maximoff really dead?

As I’ve mentioned in previous reviews, Magneto is one of my favorite characters in the X-Men mythos. Given his status as a major figure in Krakoa’s structure as a nation, the fact that he could potentially have murdered a hero of the Scarlet Witch’s stature is obviously shocking news to everyone on the island. Williams manages to wring raw emotion out of every page. Magneto is angry at the Council’s recalcitrance to resurrect Wanda, X-Factor’s investigation is impeded at every turn by members of the X-Men and X-Force, and the Scarlet Witch’s loved ones—especially Quicksilver—react to the news in different ways. Given her connections to different corners of the Marvel Universe, I appreciate Williams treating this event with the gravity it deserves.

The series also feels like an extension of Williams’ work on X-Factor, with the mutant detectives playing a major role. The first half of the issue is dedicated to their investigation, and how they use their powers to investigate crime scenes. Rachel Grey uses her psychic powers to craft a flashback of the crime scene, Daken tracks down scents using his enhanced senses, and Eye-Boy’s different forms of vision make him a walking crime lab. This era of X-Men has been big on exploring how mutants’ powers work when used in tandem, which also translates to each respective ensemble’s interactions with each other. And X-Factor knows how to combine their powers for maximum effect, whether solving crimes or fighting Magneto.

Werneck handles art duties for this issue, and it looks absolutely stunning. Werneck first came across my radar when he illustrated a series of redesigns for the X-Men and that same sleek sense of design translates to comics. X-Factor still has their snazzy suits, which consist of Matrix-style trenchcoats in a range of colors (excluding Daken, who mostly goes shirtless). Magneto himself sports a long black trenchcoat with a matching helmet, representing the grief and rage that has permeated his every being. And in a stunning two-page spread, the Scarlet Witch’s body is shown nestled on a bed formed from Krakoan flowers, with the winding branches forming the panels featuring X-Force. All of it is displayed in lush, vibrant colors by Delgado, apart from a fight sequence set at night when X-Factor confronts Magneto.

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #1 blends raw emotion and action together for a mutant murder mystery, shaking Krakoa to its core. Those who enjoyed X-Factor will definitely want to pick this book up. Between The Trial of Magneto and the upcoming Inferno, it looks like 2021 will bring trouble to the X-Men’s paradise.

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #1 is available wherever comics are sold.

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #1
5

TL;DR

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #1 blends raw emotion and action together for a mutant murder mystery, shaking Krakoa to its core. Those who enjoyed X-Factor will definitely want to pick this book up. Between The Trial of Magneto and the upcoming Inferno, it looks like 2021 will bring trouble to the X-Men’s paradise.