REVIEW: ‘Superman: Red & Blue,’ Issue #6

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Superman Red & Blue #6 

Superman: Red & Blue #6 is an anthology series published by DC Comics. The issue contains five stories in total. “Hissy Fit” is written and illustrated by Sophie Campbell, “The Scoop” is written and illustrated by Matt Wagner, colored by Brennan Wagner, and lettered by Dave Lanphear, “The Special” is written by Tom King, illustrated by Paolo Rivera, and lettered by Steve Wands, “Son of Farmers” is written by Darcie Little Badger, illustrated by Steve Pugh, and lettered by Pat Brosseau, and finally “Ally” is written by Rex Ogle, illustrated by Mike Norton, and lettered by Steve Wands.

“The Special” is the story that most fans will be drawn to due to King’s pedigree and Rivera’s art. King has written many series for DC, including Mister Miracle and Strange Adventures while Rivera is known for his work on Marvel characters such as Spider-Man and Daredevil. The story focuses on a waitress named Annie, who works at a cafe where Clark Kent spends the most important moments of his life. From Martha and Jonathan Kent finding a baby Kal-El to Clark taking his wife Lois and son Jon to the cafe, King’s script touches on the various stages of Superman’s life with Rivera showcasing Superman’s growth from a simple infant to the Man of Steel we all known and love. In perhaps the most surprising story element of all, “The Special” is mostly presented in black and white, with flashes of the series’ trademark red-and-blue color scheme. It helps make the conversation between Clark and Annie at the end all the more special.

“Ally” is another emotional tale featuring a boy struggling to tell his parents he’s gay. Inspiration comes in the form of Superman, who revealed his secret identity as Clark Kent to the world during Brian Michael Bendis’ run on Superman and Action Comics. Ogle does a great job of building up to both revelations, as the boy weighs Superman’s trials and tribulations against his own. And in another great shift from the series’ style, the final pages from Norton feature a burst of color when the boy comes out to his parents. It’s a testament to the true power of these heroes: inspiration. Whether it’s crafting your own stories or telling your family the truth about yourself, superheroes have often served as a fount of inspiration for others, and “Ally” captures that.

Perhaps the best story to me was “The Scoop.” Wagner, who previously wrote and illustrated the DC miniseries Trinity, decides to turn the spotlight on why Clark Kent decided to become a reporter. The story also shows his growing frustration with his exploits as Superman constantly making the front page while his own stories get pushed to the back. It’s a struggle I’ve felt as a writer, too: Does my work matter? Will anyone want to read this? These are questions I’ve often asked myself. But I continue to soldier on, and so does Clark, who essentially decides to handle the matter in a way only Superman could.

Superman: Red & Blue #6 wraps up the series with stories that deviate from the titular color scheme but are still heartfelt and impactful. If you are a Superman fan, you owe it to yourself to pick up this series when it’s collected in trade form.

Superman: Red & Blue #6 is available wherever comics are sold.

Superman: Red & Blue #6
4.5

TL;DR

Superman: Red & Blue #6 wraps up the series with stories that deviate from the titular color scheme but are still heartfelt and impactful. If you are a Superman fan, you owe it to yourself to pick up this series when it’s collected in trade form.