REVIEW: ‘Catwoman,’ Issue #34

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Catwoman #34

Catwoman #34 is published by DC Comics, written by Ram V, with art by Fernando Blanco, colors by Jordie Bellaire, and letters by Tom Napolitano. Having been pulled from her potential watery grave by the timely arrival of Batman, Selina takes a moment of comfort in her love’s arms before once more leaping into the fire that Alleytown has become.

This book’s opening delivers a level of tenderness that contrasts so much to both the events that preceded it, as well as the rest of the book that follows it, that it cannot help but leave a striking impression on the reader. The mix of sweet, playful, and loving compassion that moves between the pair is delivered by writer Ram V with just enough force to make it leave the desired impression without crossing into the realm of outright sappiness. But while this opening is a beautiful reprieve for our feline hero, Catwoman #34 has work for Selina to do. After all, the Queen of Alleytown’s realm is on fire.

Once Bruce and Selina’s fleeting moment of calm comes to an end, the issue splits its time between Selina as she heads off to confront Father Valley and Detective Hadley’s ongoing investigation into why the church was burned down. The two plot lines are interwoven at a good pace, as they interchange just where they need to to keep the tension carrying over between the dual stories. Not only are these two stories used wonderfully to balance out the narrative, but they are also brought together interestingly, in a way that both surprised me, as well as delivered a stunning ending to the issue.

But while both sides of Catwoman #34‘s main story are brought to the reader with skill, it is Ram V’s portrayal of Father Valley that steals the show. The permanent sinister aura the writing wraps the character in allows him to hold his presence well when pitted against the force the series has established Selina as.

The book’s art keeps up with the story’s shifting tones well, as artist Blanco shows off the full range of talents at their disposal. From the tenderness of Bruce and Selina to the viciousness of Valley and Catwoman, Blanco brings all of these moments to life in a way that keeps everything impactful and important. Plus, this issue also sees the return of a figurative representation of Selina that was one of the things that originally caught my eyes about this book, and it was a wonderful surprise to see it return here.

Just as Blanco’s lines bring Catwoman #34‘s story to life, this is aided greatly by another fantastic performance on colors by Bellaire. The colorist’s mastery of utilizing color to enhance and deliver emotion is on full display throughout the many moments of this story.

Wrapping up our look at the book’s presentation is Napolitano’s letters. The letterer manages to bring the story into the art in a seamless way and often complements the visuals it is integrated into.

So to sum it up, Catwoman #34 delivers another fantastic issue that delivers emotion, action, and a surprising ending. I look forward to what next month’s tale will bring.

Catwoman #34 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Catwoman #34
5

TL;DR

So to sum it up, Catwoman #34 delivers another fantastic issue that delivers emotion, action, and a surprising ending. I look forward to what next month’s tale will bring.