REVIEW: ‘Children of the Atom,’ Issue #6

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Children of the Atom #6 - But Why Tho

Children of the Atom #6 is a comic published by Marvel. Written by Vita Ayala with art by Paco Medina. Additional inks by Walden Wong. Colours are by David Curiel and the letterer is Travis Lanham. This is the last of the series.

A group of six young mutants has been acting like superheroes, battling villains and saving lives. They idolized the X-Men and dreamed of joining them on Krakoa. Their only problem: They weren’t mutants. In several instances they pretend to be mutants, trying to trick the gates into opening for them. In their final attempt, they were attacked and captured by the U-Men, saved only by the arrival of their heroes. Their cover blown, the teenagers return home with their tails between their legs. But Storm is not finished, as she gifts a ticket to the Hellfire Gala to the one mutant in their group: Gimmick.

In this issue, Carmen’s friends react to the revelation that she has been hiding this huge secret from them. This leads to her and Buddy (Cyclops-Lass) having a giant argument, with both laying down brutal truths. Angry and rejected, Gimmick heads to the Hellfire Gala on her own. Here she is exposed to the X-Men and the superhero community properly. But in the aftermath of the party, she still has her family to go back to, and decisions to make. 

The ending to this plot is incredible. So much of this series has been building to several integral moments that transpired last issue, but the ramifications of everything that has happened are what come calling within Children of the Atom #6. All of the plotlines that Ayala has carefully weaved come to a close, and every single one feels earned and accomplished. The pacing is fantastic, staying at a slow speed that prevents any ending from being rushed. Many of the events inside this issue could have been seen coming, but the final beat is a brilliant surprise.

This last issue is possibly the most emotionally charged of the bunch. Carmen is an amazing character and Ayala has created an amazing arc for her. The writer beautifully captures how frightening coming to terms with your own identity can be, and the bravery it takes to come out. The theme of identity has been the core of this series, and the eloquence in which it is explored in this issue is gorgeous. This series has shown how difficult finding your identity can be, leading to experimentation and discovery. 

This is the first time that the chemistry of the team has been tarnished, and the dialogue within this conflict is fantastic. The power in the argument between Cyclops-Lass and Gimmick is palpable as six issues of struggles pour out. Buddy needed to have it pointed out how awful her actions have been over the course of the story. The hurt seeps out of both voices, and the way they speak feels authentic to their age. Arguments between people of that age do cross lines and are nasty, which often leads to the biggest changes. Similarly, the conversation between Carmen and her family is achingly good. There are large passages of text from start to finish, but Ayala has carefully chosen every single word.

The art manages to get even better as the book progresses. A large part of that is the advent of the Hellfire Gala. Medina is given free rein to show the glamour of the party, and that is done splendidly. Every single mutant is given a special costume that speaks to their character, and the designs are jaw-dropping. So many comics expose the dangers of being a mutant, and that is indeed a factor in this series too. But Medina and Wong present the majesty and beauty in this world, too, giving Carmen a glimpse of what she now belongs to. 

The colours are stunning. There appears to be a difference in atmosphere from the Gala to back on Earth. At home, the colours are muted. But on Mars, there is a glorious shine to everything. The different palettes that each individual costume is blessed with are phenomenal. 

The letters are crucial inside this issue and Lanham delivers tremendously. The large amount of dialogue is split nicely over the panels and very easy to read and follow.

Children of the Atom #6 finishes the series with the best issue. This is the chapter that truly gives this miniseries a soul. As relationships are tested and identities are discovered, the book explores important themes in a way that will blow readers away. Ayala’s script is powerful and touching and the art is incredible. This is a fantastic comic for young adults.

Children of the Atom #6 is available where comics are sold.

Children of the Atom #6
5

TL;DR

Children of the Atom #6 finishes the series with the best issue. This is the chapter that truly gives this miniseries a soul. As relationships are tested and identities are discovered, the book explores important themes in a way that will blow readers away. Ayala’s script is powerful and touching and the art is incredible. This is a fantastic comic for young adults.