REVIEW: ‘X-Men,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

x-men #2 - But Why Tho

X-Men #2 is written by Gerry Duggan, illustrated by Pepe Larraz, colored by Marte Garcia, and lettered by VC’s Clayton Cowles. It is published by Marvel Comics.  Part 2 of the “Fearless” storyline features another threat launched against Earth, which happens to be a leftover portion of the Annihilation Wave. Unless the X-Men stop it, the wave will consume all of Kansas. Little do the mutant heroes know that the attack is part of a game launched by the alien bookmaker Cordyceps Jones, who is taking all bets against the future of humanity.

Much like the first issue, this story features a perfect melding of writing and art, combined with the X-Men acting as a well-oiled unit. Duggan writes the X-Men as a hybrid of a superhero team and family, which to me has always been the major draw of the X-world. Jean Grey teaches Synch about the nature of telepathy, and what to do when he harnesses her power-it also doesn’t hurt that half of the lettering is displayed in thought balloons. When combatting the Annihilation Wave, Rogue flings a pile of logs at them which Cyclops shapes into spears with his optic blasts. And Wolverine does what she does best-which is stabbing bad guys. Duggan’s script also continues to show how the X-Men are a large part of the Marvel Universe, from the big (the Annihilation Wave was a threat that took the full might of the Guardians of the Galaxy and other cosmic champions to stop) and small (Rogue catches Gambit holding a poker game with the Thing, Black Cat, and the Rhino in the X-Men’s treehouse base-leading to a marital quarrel).

Duggan’s script is brought to life by Larraz and Garcia, who continue to be some of the best artists working in the comics business. Larraz never misses the chance to draw a splash page; from the X-Men leaping into battle against the Annihilation Wave to Jean and Synch floating above Central Park, this book continues to feel “superheroic” in terms of the scope that Larraz is putting on the page. The book also dips into cosmic horror, especially where the Annihilation Wave and Cordyceps Jones are concerned. Those who have read the original Annihilation storyline remember the sheer destruction it can cause, and the disturbing sight of massive space insects and worms consuming everything in their path. Jones himself is scary as hell; as his name insinuates, he is a sentient fungus growing out of the corpse of an astronaut. Looking at his twisted mass of mushrooms brings back memories of playing The Last of Us-or should I say nightmares.

Garcia’s rich color art brings the scenes to life and helps set the mood for certain scenes. Jones’ base Gameworld looks like Vegas in space-all glittering fireworks and bright attractions. The scene in Central Park features a mix of black and purple that depicts New York City in sunset, lending it an easy serenity. And when Sunfire brings the full brunt of his power to bear, there is a page of reddish-orange flame that seems to sear the eyeballs.

X-Men #2 continues to reestablish the mutant heroes as part of the Marvel Universe, pitting them against a deadly cosmic threat. The ending hints at another classic villain that the X-Men will face, and I can’t wait to see how the creative team handles this mission.

X-Men #2 is available wherever comics are sold.

X-Men #2
5

TL;DR

X-Men #2 continues to reestablish the mutant heroes as part of the Marvel Universe, pitting them against a deadly cosmic threat. The ending hints at another classic villain that the X-Men will face, and I can’t wait to see how the creative team handles this mission.