REVIEW: ‘Silk,’ Issue #5

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Silk #5

Silk #5 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Maurene Goo, illustrated by Takeshi Miyazawa, colored by Ian Herring, and lettered by VC’s Ariana Maher. Following the end of the fourth issue, tech mogul Saya Ishii has come to Cindy Moon for help battling the cat demon Kasha. Kasha intends to use dark magic to summon a malevolent god who is implied to bring about the end of humanity. With the help of her brother Albert and some technology from the United World Defense Council, Cindy and Saya have to save the world. No pressure.

Throughout the series, the creative team has underlined the similarities and differences between Cindy and Saya. Both have dealt with traumatic events in their lives: Cindy spent the better part of a decade underground in a bunker separated from her family and friends, while Saya’s strained relationship with her own father leads to a life of crime. Goo’s script showcases the clear differences between the two during their fight with Kasha and her god; Cindy is willing to reach out to her fellow heroes, including Spider-Man and Mockingbird, before getting Albert involved. Saya, on the other hand, is willing to go to extreme lengths to exact her vengeance on Kasha. Goo also throws a wrinkle into the mix by flat out confirming that Saya is attracted to Cindy-which makes the fact that her brother Max was pretending to be Cindy’s therapist even more awkward since Cindy trusted him (and was attracted to him.)

Miyazawa and Herring illustrate a massive fight scene that involves Cindy, Saya, Kasha, and a massive deity that takes up the majority of the issue-and once again emphasizes the differences between the various combatants. Kasha and her god are massive beings, with the god resembling a red-skinned oni complete with a row of horns surrounding its head and giving off the appearance of a crown. Cindy engages Kasha in hand-to-hand combat, using her agility and webs to outsmart the massive cat creature; Saya uses her various drones to attack the oni and Kasha simultaneously. Herring’s color art paints a moody picture, utilizing various shades of black and purple to create a nighttime environment; the same colors are prominent in Saya’s wardrobe and contrast Cindy’s red/black/white ensembles. Even the lettering has its own red and white coloring, fitting Cindy’s narration.

The best part of the issue for me was the ending, which underlines why Cindy is such a great character. Despite being betrayed by somebody she trusted, she doesn’t wallow in it. She manages to hit her deadlines at Threats & Menaces (even with J. Jonah Jameson being…well, J. Jonah Jameson.) She decides to go out and have drinks with her family and friends. The final page features her swinging through the air, and resolving to move forward. “It’s taken me a long time to be okay with letting people in my life,” she says in the issue’s closing captions. “I’m not going to let this set me back.”

Silk #5 brings an end to Cindy Moon’s latest adventure while showcasing everything that makes the character so appealing. The letters page hints that Silk will make a return, and whether it’s this creative team or a different one, I’m ready to see more of Cindy’s adventures in the Marvel Universe.

Silk #5 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Silk #5
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TL;DR

Silk #5 brings an end to Cindy Moon’s latest adventure while showcasing everything that makes the character so appealing. The letters page hints that Silk will make a return, and whether it’s this creative team or a different one, I’m ready to see more of Cindy’s adventures in the Marvel Universe.