REVIEW: ‘Justice League Infinity,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Justice League Infinity #2

Justice League Infinity #2 is written by J.M. DeMatteis and James Tucker, illustrated by Ethen Beavers, colored by Nick Fliardi, and lettered by Tom Napolitano. It is published by DC Comics. Part two of “The Crack’d Mirror” finds Superman replaced with an alternate version of himself named Overman. While Overman fights off the forces of the League, Superman finds himself in a reality where the immortal tyrant Vandal Savage helped the Nazi regime win World War II. Elsewhere, the android Amazo grapples with the consequences of shattering the Mirrored Room and the ever-present question of whether or not he has a soul.

Once again, Tucker and DeMatteis’ script feels like it could have been a lost Justice League Unlimited episode. References are made to other series in the DC Animated Universe, particularly the Superman: The Animated Series episode “Brave New Metropolis” and the Justice League Season 1 finale “The Savage Time.” Those episodes saw a Superman who ruled over a fascistic version of Metropolis and a world where Savage helped the Axis Powers take over the world, respectively; elements from those storylines have been merged to make Overman’s world.

Tucker and DeMatteis also draw parallels between Amazo and J’onn J’onzz, especially regarding their emotional state. J’onn left the League to try and reconnect with humanity; it seems that no matter what he does, he will always be drawn into conflict-which culminates in a confrontation with Overman where he crosses a line with his psychic powers. Likewise, Amazo was built to adapt and evolve to anything and gained godlike powers as a result—but the answer to the question he seeks is far from his reach, and it haunts him. Even Superman gets in on the act; while Overman is a snarling dictator who belittles women and thinks his powers give him the right to rule over others, Superman is willing to talk to the citizens of Overman’s Earth and remembers the lessons his adopted father taught him. The best part about JLU is that it dug into the humanity of the characters, even when they weren’t from Earth; I’m glad that the writers of Infinity haven’t abandoned that.

Beavers’ art also oscillates between moments big and small, showcasing the Martian Manhunter in quiet contemplation on one page and displaying the full force of the Justice League taking on Overman on another. He also gets the chance to design alternate versions of Superman’s foes, including a Brainiac made up of multiple floating drones. Overman and Superman also differ in stature and uniform; while the Man of Steel stands tall in his trademark red and blue suit, Overman is almost always shown towering over others and wears a severe gray, black, and red uniform with a more militaristic design-including the shield on his chest. Filardi’s colors help differentiate worlds and realities; the main Earth bears cool blue skies, while Overman’s Earth has the blood-red hue associated with DC’s various Crisis events. They even permeate the lettering; Brainiac’s speech bubbles have a green barrier around them, while his words are rendered in digital letters to reflect his lack of personality as a machine.

Justice League Infinity #2 acts as both an action-adventure story and a meditation on the point of existence while continuing to mind the history of the DC Animated Universe for new stories. With reality now literally falling apart due to Amazo’s actions, I doubt it’ll be long before the League comes face to face with more alternate versions of themselves—and like Overman, I expect them to be unfriendly.

Justice League Infinity #2 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Justice League Infinity #2
5

TL;DR

Justice League Infinity #2 acts as both an action-adventure story and a meditation on the point of existence while continuing to mind the history of the DC Animated Universe for new stories. With reality now literally falling apart due to Amazo’s actions, I doubt it’ll be long before the League comes face to face with more alternate versions of themselves—and like Overman, I expect them to be unfriendly.