REVIEW: ‘Daredevil,’ Issue #32

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Daredevil #32 - But Why Tho

Daredevil #32 is published by Marvel Comics. Written by Chip Zdarsky. The penciller is Mike Hawthorne whilst inks are by Adriano Di Benedetto. The colourist is Marcio Menyz and the letterer is Clayton Cowles. Daredevil is still in prison, but with a new purpose. After being poisoned, ambushed and nearly killed, he is tasked with being an FBI informant and investigating deaths inside the prison. Confronting the warden goes badly, landing him in solitary confinement. With him stuck in jail, Elektra has been acting as the guardian of Hell’s Kitchen. She has been successful at installing her dominance, battling the mobsters and mafia. But Bullseye is free, and that spells danger for everyone. 

In this issue, the city is in lockdown as the world’s deadliest assassin is on the loose and wracking up bodies at an incalculable rate. Elektra, Spider-Man and other heroes are all searching for him as remains elusive from surveillance. Kingpin is also in hiding, fearing that he has become a target. And Daredevil’s new placement in the prison has actually allowed him to spy on his enemies speaking above him. But the warden is not finished with trying to remove Matt by force.

The beautiful structure and pacing of Daredevil are slowly reaching their pinnacle. For many issues now the three main characters of the series have been acting independently of each other, the problems of their own lives preoccupying them. But they are beginning to intersect. Zdarsky has been patient with this storytelling, never rushing to reach certain points. Daredevil #32 is unbearably tense. There is an active shooter on the loose, who happens to be the most accurate shooter in the Marvel Universe, and all three of the beacons of the story are potential targets. There is a slow lead up to a fantastic fight at the end that has been held back for so long that the readers were desperate for it. But there is actually more than one battle in this comic and all will have massive ramifications. And the final page is a terrifying revelation.

The characters are remarkable inside this issue. One of the fascinating aspects of the last arc is that Daredevil’s arc within his own comic hasn’t been the focus. It has been gripping and interesting, certainly, but Bullseye’s escape has been drawing the reader’s attention. This allows Matt’s story to go under the radar until its impact on the arc becomes unavoidable. But it is nice to see Murdock begin to regain some confidence in himself. He recognises his ability as a fighter and his stature as a superhero. 

The element of fear that Zdarsky places within powerful, usually fearless characters shows just how dangerous this villain is. Elektra is vengeful but nervous, whilst Kingpin is terrified to even leave one room. Speaking of Fisk, the relationship between him and Typhoid Mary is one of the most underrated subplots of this run. It’s touching and sweet, something that can’t be said about most romances between murderers. They genuinely seem to care about each other. I’m also petrified that one of them could get hurt.

It was also very interesting to see a conversation between Elektra and Spider-Man. She has not encountered another hero since she started rocking the horns, but she has the presence to demand respect from anyone. 

The art within Daredevil #32 is awesome. The three fight scenes within the issue are intense and brilliantly choreographed by Hawthorne. The artist acknowledges each character involved and adjusts their style accordingly. The motion lines added as Daredevil swings heighten the sense of movement and impact that is felt by the reader, reminding them and those he fights that he is a force to be reckoned with. The fear mentioned before regarding Bullseye is captured exceptionally in the line art as well. The dread and nerves are easily identified due to the intricate details by Hawthorne and Di Benedetto. It can also be seen in the prison guards, taken aback by the skill and ferocity of Daredevil. As for Bullseye, he is spine-chilling with a permanent grin on his face.

The colours are perhaps less vibrant than they have been in previous issues, but they are still very stunning. It matches the art style as Menyz frequently just uses single shades on each surface, as opposed to blending tones. This results in smooth colours that look beautiful. The costumes of Elektra and Bullseye are still rich and eye-catching, but if they were brighter then it may have taken away from the dark nature of the scene. The backgrounds are gorgeous, often one colour that provides the foreground with the ability to truly stick out.

The lettering is very easy to read, superbly placed by Cowles. The SFX are the perfect size as they add emphasis to the scene without being distracting.

Daredevil #32 is a powerhouse of an issue. The quality of this comic is unwavering and the story never ceases to amaze. The tension is ramping up and Zdarsky will always find ways to shock the reader. The manipulation of three parallel character arcs that are just now coming back together is masterful. The city is in the clutches of one of Marvel’s most ruthless villains, and the writer’s execution is incredible. The art provides this action-thriller with both suspense and action when either is needed. And as each issue ends the threat gets more frightening every time. 

Daredevil #32 is available where comics are sold.

Daredevil #32
4.5

TL;DR

Daredevil #32 is a powerhouse of an issue. The quality of this comic is unwavering and the story never ceases to amaze. The tension is ramping up and Zdarsky will always find ways to shock the reader. The manipulation of three parallel character arcs that are just now coming back together is masterful. The city is in the clutches of one of Marvel’s most ruthless villains, and the writer’s execution is incredible. The art provides this action-thriller with both suspense and action when either is needed. And as each issue ends the threat gets more frightening every time.