REVIEW: ‘Static: Season One,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Static Season One #2 - But Why Tho

Static: Season One #2 is written by Vita Ayala with layouts by ChrisChross and finishes/colors by Nikolas Draper-Ivey, and lettering by Andworld Design. It is published by DC Comics. Following the end of the first issue, Hotstreak has burned down Virgil Hawkins’ house and Virgil’s resulting fight with Hotstreak has revealed his metahuman abilities to his parents Robert and Jean. While the Hawkins family argues about what to do with Virgil’s abilities, Virgil seeks help from his mentor Curtis Metcalf – who will soon become the armored vigilante known as Hardware.

The second issue of a series is honestly the most tricky thing to pull off in my eyes. Anyone can write a great first issue; it’s the second issue that keeps the audience’s interest and continues to push the story forward. In that respect, the creators succeed because they treat the destruction of the Hawkins house with all the gravitas it deserves, and how it impacts Virgil and his family. The idea of the “Big Bang” granting people powers is also explored in great detail; much like mutants in the Marvel Universe, metahumans are regarded with fear and hatred. This is made explicitly clear in a sequence where a metahuman with a demonic appearance is hunted by military forces. The image of a kid being chased down by shadowy men wielding electric batons is a chilling image, even if the kid in question has horns and red skin.

Ayala continues to upend the Static mythos with their script, with this issue making one major change. In the original comic, none of Virgil’s family members knew his secret. Here, his fight with Hotstreak reveals his powers to them and the reactions are varied. Virgil’s father Robert wants to keep his powers a secret, while his mother Jean wants to take him to the doctor to get examined. And his sister Sharon, who usually gets on his nerves, is genuinely concerned about where Virgil is mentally more than physically. Opening up Virgil’s secret to his family opens more storytelling avenues; how will they react to him becoming Static? What are the consequences of being around a metahuman? It’s truly gripping stuff. And that’s not even getting into the appearance of Hardware and another Milestone character; it’s a way to show that this universe isn’t just Static without overwhelming the main story.

ChrisCross and Draper-Ivey continue to wow with their anime-inspired artwork and intense displays of superhuman powers. Key among them is Virgil, who as the title character is the most expressive of the cast. One page shows his face lighting up with joy when he discovers a warehouse full of gear that can help him control his powers. Another sequence features Virgil menacingly approaching Hotstreak, his eyes and fists crackling with lightning. Draper-Ivey’s color art helps set the mood for various scenes in the book; one sequence has the Hawkins family standing in the ashes of their home, with bright lights illuminating the darkened rooms. Blue continues to be a prominent color in the comic, particularly with Virgil’s clothing and power set.

Static: Season One #2 continues to explore its titular hero’s mental state and growing powers while also expanding the scope and scale of the Milestone Universe. The series continues to impress, especially with the creative team’s reverence for the source material and their inventiveness in updating his origin for modern-day times.

Static: Season One #2 is available wherever comics are sold.

Static: Season One Issue #2
5

TL;DR

Static: Season One #2 continues to explore its titular hero’s mental state and growing powers while also expanding the scope and scale of the Milestone Universe. The series continues to impress, especially with the creative team’s reverence for the source material and their inventiveness in updating his origin for modern-day times.