ADVANCED REVIEW: ‘Black Cat,’ Issue #8

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Black Cat #8 - But Why Tho

Black Cat #8 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Jed MacKay, art by C.F. Villa, colors by Brian Reber, and letters by Ferran Delgado. Despite the fact that Felicia Hardy is still coming to terms with her recent confrontation with the Black Fox, she finds herself on the prowl. But this isn’t just any job. This is the biggest score of her career. And when you have had a career like Felicia’s, that’s saying something.

As the storyline title “Infinity Score” implies, Black Cat is still embroiled in the ongoing events surrounding the Infinity Stones that are happening in the pages of the Infinite Destinies one-shots. But how does her latest heist tie into the events surrounding the godlike powers of the infamous Stones? No spoilers here, but it certainly has the potential to be a game-changer. Provided the Cat hasn’t gotten in over her head of course.

The storyline of Black Cat #8 follows Felicia as she executes her latest heist. Writer MacKay delivers a smooth-running narrative for the heist itself that gives the protagonist plenty of opportunities to flex her impressive set of skills. Even when things inevitably go sideways, Felicia never feels like she is off her game.

The only thing that puts a wrinkle in Black Cat #8’s generally solid story is the presence of certain characters. These individuals have been placed in particular situations in recent comics that would seem to indicate they wouldn’t be showing up for this story as well. While later stories may explain the how’s and why’s of their presence, or some measure of time-skip between the relative books, for the moment, their involvement brings a level of confusion that ultimately detracts from the tale.

Just like the story, the art of Black Cat #8 does a great job of highlighting the central character’s calm, cool demeanor as she goes about plying her trade. Artist Villa brings all of Felicia’s acrobatics and finesses throughout the story, keeping the character’s gracefulness as a constant throughout her heist.

The other element that Villa brings to good effect in the art here is the feeling of motion. As Black Cat bounds, leaps, and tumbles through the story, the art through both design and camera placement often gives the feeling like it is barely keeping up with its agile subject.

The colorwork in Black Cat #8 does a strong job of capturing its setting and time of day. Colorist Reber does a beautiful job balancing the harsh city lights against the coolness of the light provided by the night sky. While some of these moments are certainly created with a bit of exaggeration to the lighting, it creates an amazing effect. And that is always the most important goal.

Lastly, let’s talk about the lettering. Delgado provides a smooth-running presentation for the narrative as the story is woven nicely through the panels. This provides the reader with a clear path to follow, while not getting in the way of the book’s art.

When all is said and done, Black Cat #8 delivers a solid narrative that just suffers from a couple of confusing character choices. With that said, the scenario the book sets up with its ending leaves Felicia and company in an interesting position. Any fan will want to see where this one is going.

Black Cat #8 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Black Cat #8
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TL;DR

When all is said and done, Black Cat #8 delivers a solid narrative that just suffers from a couple of confusing character choices. With that said, the scenario the book sets up with its ending leaves Felicia and company in an interesting position. Any fan will want to see where this one is going.