REVIEW: ‘The Flash,’ Issue #772

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Flash #772 - But Why Tho

The Flash #772 is published by DC Comics. Written by Jeremy Adams with art by Will Conrad. The colourist is Alex Sinclair and the letterer is Rob Leigh. This issue, Wally West is back in the present day after a lengthy time-travelling adventure and numerous rebirths. But now he is home, he needs to go back to working and providing for his family. He sets out in search of gainful employment, landing a job in a small garage. But this is scrapped after Mr. Terrific appears and offers him a job of his own. And one of the Flash’s hottest foes returns himself.

This issue has a lot to do in regards to the plot, and the structure is fantastic in allowing all of it to get laid out. The start of a new arc and era for Wally, much of the issue feels fresh. There is a jolly nature to the plot, the Flash and comic as a whole having a spring in its step. However, very long, drawn-out segments towards the end of the comic slow down this excitement. This is for the purpose of exposition, of which there is an extensive amount. The content of this storytelling is interesting, but unveiling all in one go zaps The Flash #772 of its momentum. The ending is set up from early in the issue so isn’t a surprise. 

Adams infuses Wally and much of the dialogue with joy and positivity. This character has been through so much exhaustion and pain that it is nice for readers to see him back. There is a freedom to how he acts as if he’s running without a weight n his shoulders anymore. It is awesome to see Mr Terrific still have a large role in this series after his appearances in the last arc. His characterization is greatly diminished due to him being a mouthpiece for the exposition. But his brilliance and kindness is another boost to the mood of those reading. As for the villain of the arc, they are given the news that will make them even more dangerous before.

For most of The Flash #772, the art is brilliant. Conrad fills each page with details that give their world depth and authenticity, such as creases on the characters’ clothing and textures on the wood that make a desk. And the characters themselves look fantastic for the majority of the comic. But there is one face that suffers, and it is unfortunately the main character’s. There are some panels where wally looks really peculiar and uncomfortable to see. He has a wide grin in a recent photo, and he looks like something from Son of the Mask. There are panels in which this has improved, but it happens more than once. 

In addition to this issue, there is a small criticism on “camera angles”. There are a few instances where a vital character is told something whilst another is present on the same panel. But the panel is far too close up, and much of what is visible is the back of another character’s head. An interesting idea, certainly, but a shot from the side would have allowed for the reader to see the reaction of the person being told news. 

The colours don’t help Wally’s unsettling look. Sinclair does a fantastic job elsewhere in the comic, with bright and vibrant tones uplifting the already positive comic. But the skin tone used for Wally is part of the reason why he looks waxy. The orange eyebrows don’t help either, and the lead character ultimately looks like a Baywatch candidate.

The lettering is easy to read with a large font that also includes thick line weights. It must be a dialogue decision, but there are occasions where a word is extended for dramatic effect, for example, “mooooooom”. Whilst initially it may seem like a good idea, as it is much better at insinuating whining than any other technique. But when actually placed in a word balloon, it can be awkward and irritating, especially when there are multiple words in the same balloon that does this.

The Flash #772 is a fun fresh start for Wally that is slightly let down by some artistic choices. The plot is exciting and nostalgic, harkening back to a classic Flash comic, and the energy that exudes when the characters are happy in this comic is infectious. But too much exposition and bizarre designs on the main character prevents the comic from really shining.

The Flash #772 is available where comics are sold.

 

The Flash #772
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TL;DR

The Flash #772 is a fun fresh start for Wally that is slightly let down by some artistic choices. The plot is exciting and nostalgic, harkening back to a classic Flash comic, and the energy that exudes when the characters are happy in this comic is infectious. But too much exposition and bizarre designs on the main character prevents the comic from really shining.