REVIEW: ‘Infinite Frontier,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Infinite Frontier #2 - But Why Tho

Infinite Frontier #2 is written by Josh Williamson, penciled by Paul Pelletier, Jesus Merino, & Xermanico,  inked by Norm Rampund, Merino, & Xermanico, colored by Romula Fajardo Jr, and lettered by Tom Napolitano. It is published by DC Comics. Picking up where Infinite Frontier #1 left off, former DEO Agent Cameron Chase is investigating what exactly happened with the Multiverse’s rebirth after Dark Nights: Death Metal. Elsewhere, Justice Incarnate travels the multiverse to learn more about what happened to Flashpoint Batman and Green Lantern Alan Scott resolves to find his missing daughter Jade. And Roy Harper must deal with the mystery of why he’s become a Black Lantern.

As he did with the previous issue, Williamson writes a script that handles plenty of characters including Chase, Scott, Harper, and Justice Incarnate. He also begins to explore more of these threads in detail, including hints at an overarching connection between the threads that involve Darkseid. The Lord of Apokolips underwent a massive change in Infinite Frontier #0 and appears to have plans that involve death and destruction that stretch across all worlds. I’ve been mostly ambivalent on Darkseid as a character over the years, but Williamson has found a way to make him threatening without resorting to the old “seeking an evil math formula that will grant him control over the entire universe” trope that’s defined his character for years.

Other characters who get a new lease on life include Flashpoint Batman and Harper, with the latter’s case being far more literal due to the Black Lantern ring he wields. In the case of Flashpoint Batman, he is actively working to help save the Multiverse-a far cry from his last appearance in Tom King’s run on Batman. Harper’s Black Lantern status is another mystery thrown into the mix. Given that the Black Lantern rings usually turn their users into horrific flesh-eating zombies, it remains to be seen why the ring chose Harper and what its connection is to Darkseid.

Xermanico returns to illustrate the issue, and this time he is joined by Merino and Pelletier. Both Merino and Pelletier are no strangers to massive superhero spectacles, with Merino illustrating Dark Nights Death Metal: Rise of the New God and Pelletier helping illustrate the Justice League/Aquaman crossover “Throne of Atlantis.” With Infinite Frontier crossing time and space itself, the trio of artists has the chance to draw a variety of characters. One page even splits into a nine-panel grid that features a different Earth, with each member of Justice Incarnate tackling a different threat.

However, my favorite art in the book involves Alan Scott and his son Obsidian as they depart to find Jade. As Obsidian uses his shadow powers, a cloud of jet black energy envelops the duo and slowly transforms into Harper’s Black Lantern ring. This scene is eye-grabbing in the best ways thanks to the trio of artists working together and Fardjardo’s color work.

Infinite Frontier #2 continues to explore the mysteries of the Multiverse while juggling multiple plot threads and characters with ease. I’m eager to continue this series and see how all these characters wind up running into each other, as well as Darkseid’s plans for the multiverse.

Infinite Frontier #2 is available wherever comics are sold.

Infinite Frontier #2
5

TL;DR

Infinite Frontier #2 continues to explore the mysteries of the Multiverse while juggling multiple plot threads and characters with ease. I’m eager to continue this series and see how all these characters wind up running into each other, as well as Darkseid’s plans for the multiverse.