REVIEW: ‘Jenny Zero,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Jenny Zero #3 - But Why Tho

Jenny Zero #3 is published by Dark Horse Comics, written by Dave Dwonch and Brockton McKinney, art by Magenta King, colors by Dam with letters by Dave Dwonch. Since going on the run from the ASP, Jenny finds herself looking up an old friend of her dad’s. Someone who has promised to train her when the time is right. Well, seems like the time is as right as it’s gonna get.

This month’s story opens with Alpha Major interrogating Jeny’s friend in an attempt to learn where Jenny has gone. This goes poorly as his target shares Jenny’s stubbornness and propensity for curse words. Nonetheless, Alpha Major is convinced the ASP will find Jenny.

From here, Jenny Zero #3 follows Jenny as she searches out the previously mentioned friend of her father’s. Having to make the obligatory trek to a frozen mountain top, Jenny finds the individual she seeks apparently awaiting her arrival. Just as I envision most of Jenny’s first meetings, this one ends with her sprawled across a floor unconscious. Hopefully, training will go better from here. Especially since the ASP is closing in on Jenny.

While this story continues to deliver all the personality and color that Dwonch and McKinney have infused in the previous issues with their writing, this delivery of character comes at the cost of Jenny Zero #3′s story. By taking the time to let the personalities play, the story feels rushed as things that seem important are left by the wayside as the issue speeds towards its close, and tries to set up its final issue.

The visual presentation of the book delivers the quirky personality of Jenny and company quite well. King’s line work continues to be a perfect fit for the style of story it accompanies. Even as the world expands in Jenny Zero #3, the linework brings each new location into the story with a look that fits the narrative.

Ther art further brings out the uniqueness of its world with Dam’s colors. The variety of colors throughout the panels bring out the eclectic feel of the characters in the story well. And despite the color scheme going all over the color spectrum, Dam never feels compelled to make any of the colors overly bright or gaudy. This creates a consistent feeling to the art, even as the color choices themselves sometimes go a bit far afield.

Wrapping up the book’s presentation is Dwonch’s lettering. The letters do a good job of delivering the story clearly, and there are some great sound effects implemented throughout the book. These effects help push the story’s colorful personality a little bit farther.

So, when all is said and done, Jenny Zero #3 delivers a tale that is big on personality, even though it rushes through its story a bit. And while it tries to do some work to get Jenny to a point to wrap up her story in the next issue, I can’t help but feel like it leaves the finale in a position to be in just as big of a rush as this issue is.

Jenny Zero #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Jenny Zero #3
3.5

TL;DR

So, when all is said and done, Jenny Zero #3 delivers a tale that is big on personality, even though it rushes through its story a bit. And while it tries to do some work to get Jenny to a point to wrap up her story in the next issue, I can’t help but feel like it leaves the finale in a position to be in just as big of a rush as this issue is.