REVIEW: ‘Masters of the Universe: Revelation,’ Issue #1

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Masters of the Universe: Revelation #1

Masters of the Universe: Revelation #1 is written by Tim Sheridan, based on a story by Kevin Smith and Rob David, illustrated by Mindy Lee, colored by Rico Renzi, and lettered by Deron Bennett. It is published by Dark Horse Comics. King Randor is assaulted by a massive creature known as the Orlax of Primeria, leaving him in a coma and slipping toward death. In order to save his father, He-Man is sent through time by the Sorceress of Castle Greyskull, coming face to face with the previous users of the Sword of Power as they battle the Orlax.

Sheridan is well known for putting new spins on long-running franchises, with his work on Teen Titans Academy serving as a key example. Here, he taps into the wild mix of genres that shape the world of Masters of the Universe. Time travel, fantasy, sci-fi: nothing was off-limits for the original animated series, and the same can definitely be said about this comic. And as somebody who enjoys stories that often bend or blend genres, Sheridan’s script is right up my alley. I expect to see more of his work in action in the Revelation series proper, as he is one of the major writers on the series.

To his credit, Sheridan also makes the story feel accessible to longtime Masters of the Universe fans as well as those who may not be familiar with the original series. All you need to know before reading this comic is that Prince Adam has a magic sword that transforms him into He-Man, though the issue hints at plot points that will be tackled in the Revelation series like the Sword of Power being divided in half and the presence of Scare-Glow. A current of fatherhood also runs through the story, as He-Man is attempting to save his father and King Greyskull-one of the first wielders of the Sword of Power-makes a devil’s deal with Scare-Glow in order to protect his family.

Lee’s artwork hews fairly close to Powerhouse Animation’s designs for Revelation and the overall fantasy design for Eternia. The difference between Prince Adam and He-Man is night and day; He-Man is a mass of muscles and manliness while Adam is a wiry youth. King Greyskull himself is a tall, muscular Black man with dreadlocks cascading down to his shoulders, and a fur-lined cape over armor that’s similar to He-Man’s. Lee also gets the chance to illustrate Scare-Glow and the Snake-Men, who were only previously shown in toy form.

Scare-Glow, true to his name, is a towering glowing skeleton, with Renzi giving him a sickly green glow. Renzi’s colors also make the various setting pop, from the starry fields within the Cosmic Corridor to the dark and stormy skies outside Castle Greyskull. And Bennett’s lettering makes the captions feel appropriately epic, especially with a single sentence in bold letters: “The Revelation Is Nigh!”

Masters of the Universe: Revelation #1 is a solid prequel to the upcoming animated series, thanks to the involvement of the series’ writer and artwork that captures the look of the universe. If you’re a fan of the original series, the trailer for Revelation caught your eye, or you just like good fantasy stories I suggest you check this out ahead of the first part of Revelation debuting on Netflix.

Masters of the Universe: Revelation #1 is available wherever comics are sold.

 

Masters of the Universe: Revelation #1
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TL;DR

Masters of the Universe: Revelation #1 is a solid prequel to the upcoming animated series, thanks to the involvement of the series’ writer and artwork that captures the look of the universe. If you’re a fan of the original series, the trailer for Revelation caught your eye, or you just like good fantasy stories I suggest you check this out ahead of the first part of Revelation debuting on Netflix.