REVIEW: ‘Green Lantern,’ Issue #4

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Green Lantern #4

Green Lantern #4 is written by Geoffery Thorne, illustrated by Tom Raney and Marco Santucci, colored by Michael Atiyeh, and lettered by Rob Leigh. It is published by DC Comics. “Polarity” picks up in the aftermath of Green Lantern #3, as John Stewart works to stay one step ahead of the invading Qinoori slavers. Meanwhile, Jo Mullein and Keli Quintela work together to discover who destroyed the Green Lanterns’ central power battery on Oa-and the prime suspect is one of the Lanterns’ deadliest foes!

The Future State: Green Lantern series saw a world where the Green Lanterns were scattered across the galaxy and forced to survive without their power rings. Thorne and Raney continue to inch even closer to this status quo, as Stewart uses alien weaponry and his strategic skills as a Marine to outwit the Qinoori. Raney’s artwork even calls back to Future State, with Stewart sporting a uniform that feels more modern and militaristic than his de facto Green Lantern uniform. The Qinoori themselves are massive, muscular beings clad from head to toe in silver armor, with Aityeh giving them dark pink skin that serves as the perfect contrast. Stewart also broadcasts a message to the Qinoori that is depicted in large green letters thanks to Aityeh and Leigh; it’s also the standout moment of the issue.

Santucci illustrates the story focused on Jo and Keli, which takes place in the ruins of Oa. The transition from Stewart’s story to theirs is rather seamless, as Stewart is shown kneeling in despair after learning what’s been happening to his fellow Lanterns. It then transitions to Santucci’s illustration of Jo in the same pose, going through the same news. Santucci also gives Keli a new costume that feels like a superhero costume, and in typical teenage fashion, she chafes at having to wear it.

In addition to setting up the Future State storyline, Thorne continues to showcase Stewarts’ skills and leadership abilities which has made me a very happy reader. Stewart has arguably become the face of the Green Lantern mythos due to his role in the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated series, so I’m thankful that a writer is finally letting him have his chance to shine. And the book continues to prove that even without his ring, Stewart is a force to be reckoned with. Thorne also plants seeds of tension between Jo and Keli as the former tries to hold together what remains of the Green Lantern Corps, and the latter chafes at Jo’s instructions as befitting a teenager. Funnily enough, these interactions reminded me of Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams’ Green Lantern/Green Arrow run, which also paired two dissimilar characters together and let them learn from each other. If that’s the vibe Thorne is going for, I welcome it.

Green Lantern #4 continues to inch John Stewart and his fellow Lanterns closer to their Future State status while providing a rollicking sci-fi adventure. With the possible reintroduction of a classic GL enemy, it looks like the Lanterns are in for the biggest fight of their lives.

Green Lantern #4 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Green Lantern #4
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TL;DR

Green Lantern #4 continues to inch John Stewart and his fellow Lanterns closer to their Future State status while providing a rollicking sci-fi adventure. With the possible reintroduction of a classic GL enemy, it looks like the Lanterns are in for the biggest fight of their lives.