REVIEW: ‘Transformers,’ Issue #31

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Transformers #31

After the Autobots escaped Iacon, they’re running out of resources. Transformers #31, published by IDW Publishing, written by Brian Ruckley, with art by Anna Malkova and Angel Hernandez, colors by David Garcia Cruz, and letters by Jake M. Wood, offers a solution to their problem.

With Megatron ruling over most of Cybertron, the Autobots are a bit out of luck. With an ever-increasing need for Energon and supplies, Perceptor formulates a big brain plan after seeing Sunstorm super-charged in a past issue. Using Jumpstream’s teleportation powers, they’re hoping that the Autobots can gain unadulterated access to every part of Cybertron, right under the Decepticons’ noses. But as usual, things don’t go as planned.

This issue marks a turn in the plot and a change in subject and focal characters. We see Ultra Magnus finally return to Cybertron after the events of Transformers Galaxies #12, but the main focal point is between Jumpstream and Perceptor. Despite the sudden shift after the end of the last arc, there’s never a hitch in the creative team’s step.

Transformers #31 lightens the mood a bit after the tension of Transformers #30, where the Autobots have finally evacuated Iacon and Megatron seems to have won. While we do see some talk about the civil war, and the end is a punch to the gut with a surprise appearance from a character no one will see coming, Perceptor is here to lighten the mood with a crazy plan that puts Jumpstream in some comical situations (well, until it doesn’t…). There’s just enough situational humor and fun dialogue to add a little dopamine to your life.

With two different artists, there are understandably two very different art styles present. And while they try to help the transition between the two by going back and forth between artists for a couple of pages, the transition still feels sudden. The transition is, however, helped by the fact that there’s also a transition in location. Nevertheless, both art styles are excellently executed. The characters are wonderfully emotive, making the passage from humor to horror in the dialogue even more impactful.

The backend of the issue stands out with not only the changeover in artists but also the heavy-handed use of shadows, which revs up the suspense and makes the cliffhanger just as weighty as the thick, heavy line work. The colorwork is well done throughout the comic with a vast palette to visually entertain between the motley of Transformers’ paint jobs, the blue hues of electronic screens, and the warm tones used whenever Jumpstream teleport. But the end of the issue is heavy with warm colors, another indication of the turn of events.

With the change in the focal point from the last issue, the creative team has done an excellent job hitting the ground running in Transformers #31. With Ruckley inserting a bit of humor into the dialogue and all the situations Jumpstream gets into and the wonderful, emotive artwork, the ending will shock your system.

Transformers #31 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Transformers #31
4.5

TL;DR

With the change in the focal point from the last issue, the creative team has done an excellent job hitting the ground running in Transformers #31. With Ruckley inserting a bit of humor into the dialogue and all the situations Jumpstream gets into and the wonderful, emotive artwork, the ending will shock your system.