REVIEW: ‘The Old Guard: Tales Through Time,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

 

The Old Guard Tales Through Time #3

The Old Guard: Tales Through Time #3 is published by Image Comics, written by Brian Michael Bendis, Robert Mackenzie, and Dave Walker, with art by Michael Avon Oeming and Justin Greenwood, colors by Taki Soma and Daniela Miwa, and letters by Jodi Wynne. While last month’s pair of tales through time took readers a bit further into the past, this month’s stories keep things a bit closer to us as we get a pair of tales set firmly in the 20th century.

Our first story takes us to Cleveland to witness a chance meeting between Andy and someone she once knew. Bendis does a great job opening this book, as it gives readers a most unusual look at Andy. Namely, they get to see her happy for once. Andy getting to smile seems like a once in a millennium occurrence. Happily, the writing here makes the most of this rare event, letting readers truly feel just how deeply Andy can be happy on the rare occasions the world permits it.

The artwork for The Old Guard: Tales Through Time #3′s opening story does a good job of reinforcing the lighter nature of its tale. Artist Oeming does a wonderful job of delivering a genuinely warm version of Andy that delivers the feeling of the story while never overdoing it either. The colorwork by Soma finishes the art’s presentation with a well-implemented choice of colors throughout the story.

The second in our pair of tales brings the reader back into the usual, harsher look of what The Old Guard is more accustomed to delivering. With the backdrop of the moon landing happening, two of the team confront a serial killer. The juxtapositioning of humanity’s greatest technical achievements in front of some of the darkest of human nature is an interesting and striking choice for writers Mackenzie and Walker.

And while the confrontation with the killer is the more notable piece of this story, it isn’t the only thing going on. While half of the team has their confrontation, the other members take in the moon landing and provide their unique view about the momentous event. Since one of my favorite aspects of The Old Guard has always been the unique takes the book has had on its characters and their points of view, this side of the story actually stood out more for me than it may for many.

The art in The Old Guard: Tales Through Time #3′s second story does a great job of capturing its time and place, as well as applying it to its long-lived protagonists. Greenwood’s art does a great job capturing the tension and emotion as the team confronts their target. Greenwood also does a great job of balancing the story visually with its other side. The artist brings the laid-back observations of the unengaged half of the team with equal skill.

This split story’s dual narrative is given a striking visual contrast thanks to colorist Miwa’s great colorwork. Both scene’s color palettes both work to set their own scene’s emotions while also contrasting and balancing each other beautifully.

Binding the whole experience together is the clean and competent lettering of Wynne. The story’s visual application always flows smoothly around the art, thanks to Wynne’s skillful work.

When all is said and done, The Old Guard: Tales Through Time #3 delivers a strikingly potent pair of tales of our long-lived protagonists. While the catchline is always that The Old Guard is “fairy tales of bullets and blood,” it’s nice to get a moment of warmth between the battlefields now and then.

The Old Guard: Tales Through Time #3 is available now wherever comics are sold.

The Old Guard: Tales Through Time #3
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TL;DR

The Old Guard: Tales Through Time #3 delivers a strikingly potent pair of tales of our long-lived protagonists. While the catchline is always that The Old Guard is “fairy tales of bullets and blood,” it’s nice to get a moment of warmth between the battlefields now and then.