REVIEW: ‘Fruits Basket: The Final Season,’ Episode 12 – “You Fought Well”

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Fruits Basket Episode 12

Fruits Basket Episode 12, of the final season, released on June 21st, 2021, to premium subscribers of Funimation and Crunchyroll. This is the second to last episode of the entire series, and as a viewer, it’s hard to inch so close to goodbye for a series that has meant so much to me for so long.

Within Fruits Basket Episode 12, we see Yuki being the last one to experience the breaking of the Zodiac curse while hanging out with Machi.  Yuki and Machi, who have been a slow-burn romantic pairing, have an amazing exchange on what it means to continue to grow together. The script allows for both Yuki and Maki to explore their deeper feelings towards one another for the first time. What I love about Fruits Basket is that men within this series are free to cry and express emotions free of judgment, and we get a Yuki crying scene. It is deeply moving. The thought of Yuki never interacting with his god again (because the Zodiac curse has been broken) has him break down in tears. However, that sadness is replaced once he realizes he does not have to hide his feelings ever again. In a grand sweeping motion, he hugs and kisses Machi in another satisfying moment that was well worth the wait. While these two characters don’t invoke the same emotions as Tohru and Kyo,  it is still a moment that is so pure, sweet, and celebratory.

Shifting focus, Akito addresses the Sohma clan with anticipation of what comes next for everyone as she continues to atone for the suffering she has caused. It’s beautiful to see Akito in makeup and the clothes she chooses to wear to express her femininity as her own person. She no longer is bound to be someone she is not. Fruits Basket Episode 12 does a great job at showcasing how difficult it is to apologize and start over. Akito can’t even fully admit to everyone all she wishes to fix but understands that no one owes her any sympathy. It’s really startling to always see Fruits Basket tackle the hard truths of interpersonal relationships and how difficult things like forgiveness, anger, and resentment are. It does not shy away from pushing our characters into the deepest, ugliest parts of themselves to become better people.

In a stunning surprise, Fruits Basket Episode 12 takes attention away from Akito to have viewers witness an incredibly emotional scene featuring Tohru’s mother. It may seem very macabre to place viewers into the POV of a dying woman, but TME Entertainment brings their game to animate and set the tone correctly. We witness Kyoko Honda’s dying moments, but it is not in vain.  In true Fruits Basket fashion,  the writers and animators of the show tell us about some of the most horrendous parts of life and use it as a pathway towards growth and happiness. The voice acting from Lydia Marie Mackay as Kyoko was difficult to get through as her monologue focused on how she is so sad to know she will not be there for Tohru in her dying moments. As Kyo was there when she died, this scene recontextualizes why she said,” I will never forgive you” aloud. It wasn’t a final jab to forever haunt Kyo but beg and plead to Kyo to “take care of her [Tohru] or I will never forgive you,” and it was just so sad. The bittersweetness of Kyoko knowing her daughter is sensitive and wishing her the ability to have a proper support system is reflective of this entire season.

Found family and surrounding yourself with those you love is a central aspect of the show. It’s so phenomenal how Fruits Basket Episode 12 had everything from the music, script, and animation weave a beautiful display of the messiness and growth of all of its main characters. 

Fruits Basket Episode 12 is now streaming on Funimation.

 

 


Fruits Basket Episode 12
  • 9/10
    Rating - 9/10
9/10

TL;DR

Found family and surrounding yourself with those you love is a central aspect of the show. It’s so phenomenal how Fruits Basket Episode 12 had everything from the music, script, and animation weave a beautiful display of the messiness and growth of all of its main characters.