REVIEW: ‘Reptil,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Reptil #2

Reptil #2 is written by Terry Blas, penciled by Enio Balam, inked by Victor Ozabala, colored by Carlos Lopez, and lettered by VC’s Joe Sabino. It is published by Marvel Comics. Following the cliffhanger in the first issue, Humberto Lopez’s world is rocked when he learns that his parents might be alive. With his cousins Eva and Julian, Humberto travels to Dinosaur World to learn more about his earth-manipulating nemesis Megalith and his parents’ disappearance. In the process, Humberto also struggles with the darker side of his powers as he fears losing control of his dinosaur transformations.

Much like Reptil #1, this issue fully embraces the fact that its protagonist is of Latinx heritage. The issue opens with a flashback of young Humberto and his parents on an archeological dig, where his father tells him, “You may not have been born in Mexico, but you’re Mexican. Never be ashamed of your heritage or where your family comes from.” Humberto’s cousins also discuss how they’ve been inspired by him, especially when they face discrimination for being third-generation Latinx teenagers. What really helps sell this is the fact that the creative team is comprised of Latinx creatives; it adds more authenticity to the proceedings.

Blas continues to flesh out Humberto’s family life, including his cousins. There’s a trick to developing a supporting cast surrounding a superhero; a writer will want to make them feel fleshed out while also coming up with genuine ways to involve them in the plot. Thankfully, Blas knows how to use Eva and Julian; Julian designs a new costume for Humberto, where it is revealed that Maria has been studying the various magic users of the Marvel Universe to bolster her own latent magic skills. This comes in handy, as Eva seems to be the only person who can open a portal to Dinosaur World, and she does so utilizing the magic that lies in Humberto’s amulet.

Balam and Ozabala clearly had a blast illustrating the sequences set in Dinosaur World, which, true to its namesake, is populated by various forms of dinosaurs-many of them carnivorous. The sight of Humberto and his cousins racing through the lush foliage with attempting to outrun Velociraptors will no doubt give readers Jurassic Park flashbacks. Humberto’s new costume also feels sleeker and functional, with Lopez choosing to apply the inverse of his original outfit’s green and black color scheme. He also gets boots, which he expresses joy at-and I can’t blame him since it’d probably be hell running around in your bare feet.

The issue also continues to build upon the mysteries introduced in Reptil #1, including Humbreto’s parents’ whereabouts and the secret origin of Megalith. Both those threads appear to be connected, and with three issues, I’m hoping to see how it all comes together. In great comics fashion, the issue also ends with a cliffhanger-and in good Marvel fashion, the superheroic aspects act as a metaphor for larger issues; in this case, the axiom that power can corrupt those who use it.

Reptil #2 acts as a love letter to its titular hero’s Latinx heritage while starting to unravel the mystery behind his powers and his parents’ disappearance. This series is continuing to be a great entry in the line of Marvel titles, and I highly recommend it to readers new and old.

Reptil #2 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Reptil #2
5

TL;DR

Reptil #2 acts as a love letter to its titular hero’s Latinx heritage while starting to unravel the mystery behind his powers and his parents’ disappearance. This series is continuing to be a great entry in the line of Marvel titles, and I highly recommend it to readers new and old.