REVIEW: ‘Heroes Return,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Heroes Return #1 - But Why Tho

Heroes Return #1 is written by Jason Aaron, penciled by Ed McGuinness, inked by Mark Morales, colored by Matt Wilson, and lettered by VC’s Cory Petit. It is published by Marvel Comics. “The Man Who Rebooted The World” finds the Avengers and the Squadron Supreme battling each other for the fate of the world. Meanwhile, President Phil Coulson-who holds the Pandemonium Cube that rewrote the world-has ordered a nuclear strike on the Black Panther’s kingdom of Wakanda!

After seven issues of build-up, the battle between the Squadron and the Avengers finally takes place-and what a battle it is. McGuinness, Morales, and Wilson deliver the same intense fight scenes that they did in the very first issue of Heroes Reborn. Hyperion’s atomic might is pitted against the godly lightning of Thor. Blade and Nighthawk engage in a high-pitched battle using their respective fight skills and weapons. Power Princess battles the twin cosmic forces of Starbrand and Phoenix. And in what has to be my favorite matchup, the Blur learns firsthand why the Black Panther is a force to be reckoned with. Laser vision, lightning, “Hawkarangs”, cosmic fire and energy blasts fill the pages- McGuinness and Morales are aiming to make sure that their audience feels every kick and punch traded by both teams.

Wilson continues to prove that he is one of the best colorists in the comic book industry, delivering a wide palette of colors according to the various heroes and their power sets. Hyperion’s atomic might is depicted as blasts of fiery red energy. while Thor’s lightning is bluish-white. The Phoenix Force is fiery orange, and Black Panther’s trademark ebony costume is laced with circuitry that gives off violet energy. Such bright and bold colors are definitely befitting of McGuinness and Morales’ bold and bombastic artwork.

Writing-wise, Aaron manages to tie a bow on the Heroes Reborn storyline while hinting at future storylines. The Squadron had long been a major part of his Avengers run, and in my humble opinion, this is one of the best storylines in this run. The Squadron is convinced that their world is worth living in and that they’ve done what the Avengers can’t: bring peace to mankind. The fact that said peace is the result of a deal with the literal Devil seems to have flown over their heads. as they believe the ends justify the means. The ending sequence hints that readers haven’t seen the last of the Squadron and that some of the changes Coulson made to the world will remain.

The thing I like the most about the Heroes Reborn storyline is that it more or less acts as the spiritual successor to the original Squadron Supreme miniseries written by the late Mark Gruenwald and illustrated by various artists. That series showcased the cost of what would happen if the world’s heroes went to any lengths-no matter how horrible-to save the world, and Aaron and his collaborators have touched upon that. (For my money, making a deal with the Devil is probably the WORST avenue one could consider when trying to save the world.)

Heroes Return #1 acts as the grand conclusion to the Heroes Reborn storyline, which serves as Jason Aaron’s finest hour on the Avengers title. I’m not sure what the future holds for the Squadron or the Avengers, but I can safely say that I enjoyed this story and wouldn’t have minded a little more time in the Squadron’s warped world.

Heroes Return #1 is available wherever comics are sold.

 

Heroes Return #1
5

TL;DR

Heroes Return #1 acts as the grand conclusion to the Heroes Reborn storyline, which serves as Jason Aaron’s finest hour on the Avengers title. I’m not sure what the future holds for the Squadron or the Avengers, but I can safely say that I enjoyed this story and wouldn’t have minded a little more time in the Squadron’s warped world.