REVIEW: ‘Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Mister Miracle The Source of Freedom #2

Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom #2 is written by Brandon Easton, illustrated by Fico Ossio, colored by Rico Renzi, and lettered by Rob Leigh. It is published by DC Comics. Following the end of the first issue, Shilo Norman is attacked by the mysterious figure N’vir Free who claims to be the daughter of Big Barda and Scott Free. Norman fights to stay one step ahead of N’vir and her soldiers, the Core, but his mask is damaged in the process, revealing to the world that he’s a Black man.

The latter plot point ends up being the driving force behind the issue, as Norman and his agent, Vito Slakind, have to deal with the fallout from Norman’s identity reveal. Ossio and Renzi opt to showcase the various conflicting points of view via a series of circular panels depicting various citizens reacting to Norman’s identity. Norman’s Mister Miracle mask is shown floating through a Boom Tube in the middle of these panels, representing the chaos his life is spiraling into. Between the attacks from N’vir, the mysterious accusations that he’s faked most of his stunts, and the revelation of his identity, Norman is not having a good time.

Ossio and Renzi also continue to excel with the action sequences, especially in the book’s first half. N’vir and Norman’s battle bounces across Metropolis, with Renzi making Norman represent a fiery ball of energy that collides into the streets. They give N’vir a design incorporating elements of her father’s Mister Miracle costume and the armor that a warrior like Big Barda would wear. N’vir also resembles her mother in appearance, with jet-black hair and a muscular build. The Core is an utterly frightening group of enemies. With their acid green skin and golden code running through their veins, they look more like the product of a cyberpunk thriller than a superhero story. I left the issue wondering more about N’vir and her history, which I hope the series explores in future issues.

Good artwork is one thing, but I’ve always been drawn to good stories in a comic; they’re half of what makes an engaging read. Easton tackles the themes of race and legacy throughout this issue, with the former Mister Miracle Thaddeus Brown revealed to have shared a similar plight to Norman because he was a Black man in entertainment. The reactions to Norman’s identity run from thinly veiled racism, with a woman claiming she hates “magicians” to outlandish exclamations of Norman practicing “blackface.” I’m glad that Easton is willing to continue to tackle the issues a Black hero might face in his career, especially when he’s carrying on the legacy of another hero. At times it almost feels like a meta-commentary on the reaction that other heroes such as Miles Morales or Jessica Cruz get from fans for taking up a legendary mantle.

Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom #2 continues to send its titular escape artist spiraling further into chaos while wrestling with the dual themes of race and legacy. The end of the issue leaves Norman in a potential position to fight back, but time will see if he can pull off his greatest escape yet.

Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom #2 is available wherever comics are sold.

Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom #2
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TL;DR

Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom #2 continues to send its titular escape artist spiraling further into chaos while wrestling with the dual themes of race and legacy. The end of the issue leaves Norman in a potential position to fight back, but time will see if he can pull off his greatest escape yet.